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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLII ([covers January 1963/July 1963])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLII, no. 1,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.7 MB)


Page [1]


CROP an
DEPARTMENT OF i
tfi-tIc   Rortnac
:PORTER                4f1
ISIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
livisaon of Agricultural Statistics
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge
V. C. Struck,
Agricultural Statisticians
C. W. LeGrande,            G. N. Tucker, Jr.,
C. A. Hines, Asst. In Charge
L. E. Krahn
Vol. XLII, No. 1
State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin
January, 1963
THE YEAR BEGAN with winter
weather conditions in full sway for
Wisconsin following some unusually
high December temperatures. Frost
penetration was reported throughout
the state and there was some snow.
For the state as a whole, Wisconsin
farmers believed vegetation went into
the dormant stage in good condition
although precipitation in some south-
ern areas particularly was well below
normal when the deep freeze began.
A considerable amount of fall plow-
ing was done late in 1962 with some
farmers on their fields early in De-
cember while dairy herds sunned
themselves in adjacent fields. Milk
cows entered the winter feeding sea-
son in excellent condition following a
season of adequate pasture feed in
most areas and mild temperatures
until late fall.
Adequate feed supplies will be
found on most farms this winter. The
total supply of corn and small grains
is smaller than reported on January
1 last year but there is a sharp gain
in the amount of hay on hand. How-
ever, some farmers point out that the
quality of both hay and corn is below
last year and more will be needed to
meet feeding requirements.
While the number of cattle on Wis-
consin farms probably will show little
change from a year ago when the
January I inventory is finished, farm-
ers plan to increase hog production
even though feed supplies are smaller
this year. January 1 estimates indi-
cate Wisconsin farmers have 11 per-
cent less corn on hand that a year
ago and oat stocks are down 5 per-
cent. Stocks of wheat and barley are
also smaller than a year ago while
there is an increase in the holdings
of soybeans, flaxseed and rye.
Grain and Hay Stocks
on Wisconsin Farms,
on January 1
1963
Crop      1963    1962       cent
Thousand bushels  Percent
Corn   ......  89,067  100,149  89
Wheat.        473      645     73
Oats        91,478   96,224    95
Soybeans     1,073     927    116
Flaxseed.      48       38    126
Barley        528      628     84
Rye           170      150    113
Thousand tons
t~lf.       7,978  1  6,623   120
The National Situation
Feed grain supplies on farms in the
nation are about equal to a year ago
although there is a drop of 2 percent
in farm stocks of corn. Food grain
and soybean stocks are below a year
ago. The nation's hay supply is up
5 percent from last year and 4 per-
cent above average.
Fall seeded grain crops in the im-
portant Central Plains area generally
grew later in the season than usual.
December harvest of 1962 late crops
was done under favorable conditions
in most areas, and more than the
usual amount of fall plowing was re-
ported in the Corn Belt States.
Income Down With
Lower Milk Prices
While 3 percent more milk was
probably sold by Wisconsin farmers
in 1962 than in 1961, income from
this source will be lower because of the
drop in prices. And total cash farm
income in 1962 probably will be a
little below the previous year mainly
Weather Summary, December, 1962
I   Temperature
Station
0  ~~~'     0
3     Z
Superior  -23   60   17   18.2
Spooner   -26   58   17   17.4
Park Falls -24  57   15  16.6
R'nlander -22   56   17   17.9
Medford   -29   57   17   17.8
Marinette -15   60   23  24.5
Antigo    -21   58   18  19.8
Amery     -15   59   17   17.9
Riv. Falls -18  61   21   19.2
La Crosse -17   60   22  21.8
Hatfield
Dam     -18   64  22   20.5
M'rs'field -25  59   18   19.2
Hancock   -26   60   19  20.5
Oshkosh   -18   63   22  22.8
Gr. Bay   -19   61   20  21.5
Portage   -21   65  26   24.4
S'boygan  -11   62   24  25.5
Mn'towoc -15    61   23  26.0
Lancaster -19   57   22  23.9
D'rlingt'n -29  64   22  24.1
Hillsboro  -30  61   20  22.2
Madison   -22   61   20  22.6
Beloit    -12   64  28   26.7
Lake
Geneva -12    60   23  25.9
Milwa'kee
(airport) -14  62   22  24.6
Av. for 25
stations  -20.0 60.4 20.6 21.7
Precipitation
V
X   ~   a
5, Z   a
0.07
0.22
1.12
0.66
0.75
1.31
0.75
0.34
0.41
0.30
0.40
0.67
0.70
0.73
1.03
0.80
1.01
0.81
0.69
0.71
0.44
0.90
0.47
0.75
0.55
0.66
0.88
0.84
1.16
1.14
1.33
1.38
1.03
0.82
1.09
1.15
0.95
1.10
1.03
1.34
1.18
1.29
1.68
1.50
1.35
1.40
1.13
1.31
1.54
2.12
1.63
1.26
-3.24
-1.04
.3.30
-4.82
-5.46
l 3.40
-1.73
+6.53
4- 2.89
-3.77
.1.59
+ 1.21
-1.61
-0.55
+ 1.31
-7.44
+ 0.87
-2.78
40.31
-1.46
.6.03
-8.19
-11.36
-8.72
-7.16
-2.55
because of the smaller return from
milk. The purchasing power of the
farm dollar last year also dropped a
hit more because of the record high
prices paid by farmers.
Wisconsin farmers may have receiv-
ed an average of $3.41 a hundred
pounds for milk of average test sold
in 1962. This price is down 14 cents
or 4 percent from the previous year
and the lowest since 1959. The year
ended with the December average of
$3.45 or 22 cents below the average
for December 1961.
Farmers in the state received high-
er prices for meat animals during the
summer months, but the index of
meat animal prices for 1962 was only
2 percent above a year earlier. Egg
prices showed some strength in the
last two months of 1962 but for the
year were off 6 percent from 1961.
The index of prices received bv
Wisconsin farmers for 1962 was 248
percent of the 1910-14 average or 2
percent below  1961. The index of
prices paid by farmers  t n   9    .
percent of the 1910-14Btj         114
percent above 1961 a      e   iglest
on record.               L    b  6      1%3
L'GISLATIVE
REFERENCE LIBRARY
IN THIS ISSUE
January Crop Report
Farm stocks of hay are a fifth
larger than a year ago but holdings
of grain, particularly corn, are below
January 1961.
Milk Production
December marked the first month
in 1962 that milk production failed
to show an increase over the cor-
responding month of the previous
year.
Egg Production
Egg production on Wisconsin farms
in December held to a year earlier
level even though the number of
layers was the smallest for the
month in 37 years.
Farm Prices
The index of prices received by
Wisconsin farmers last year was 2
percent below 1961 while the index
of prices paid gained 1 percent to
reach a new high.
Farm Wage Rates
Wages paid by Wisconsin farmers
last year were 2 percent above 1961
and the highest on record.
Agricultural Price Trend Chart
Features
_ __
,"Ww^u nsVwrnv Bar


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