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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLI ([covers January 1962/December 1962])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLI, no. 11,   pp. [1]-8 PDF (3.7 MB)


Page [1]


C. D. Caparoon, In Charge
5."'-we              -.- Sor-WS  Ai
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:REPORTER
---jrV         Ols osTAT   ULMKIMENT OF AGRICULTURE   A     x    WISCONSIN
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
*Statletlcol Reporting Service                       Division of Agriculturol
Statistics
Agricultural Statiaticiano e                 -     .
V. C. Struck,              C. W. LeGrande,              G. N. Tucker, Jr.,
           L. E. Krahn
Vol. XLI, No. 11               State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin        
        November 1962
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IN THIS ISSUE
November Crop Report
Total crop production this
year will be below last year
and in many cases under
average because of acreage
reduction for many crops.
On November 1 the state's
corn crop was estimated at
100 million bushels.
Milk Production
Wisconsin's dairy herds
produced 1,346 million
pounds of milk in October
or nearly 14 percent of the
9,771 million pounds pro-
duced in the nation. Milk
cow numbers in the United
States are the smallest since
1910.
Egg Production
Wisconsin egg production
for the first 10 months of
1962 was ahead of the
same period lost year by
almost 3 percent, while na-
tionally, production was up
about 2 percent. In October
Wisconsin flocks produced
an average of 1,671 eggs
per 100 layers.
Farm Prices
The October index of all
prices received by Wisconsin
farmers was 254 percent of
the 1910-14 average com-
pared with the index of
prices paid at 303 percent.
Current Trend Charts
Features
Forest Products Price Re-
view-information on
the current Wisconsin
timber market.
The 1963 Outlook-a
brief summary of a re-
cent agricultural fore.
cast.
WISCONSIN FOR THE MOST
PART had a good crop season
this year. But only the faith that
comes with years of experience kept
many farmers going to the end of
the crop season.
This was a season marked by ex-
cessive rains in the north, high winds
and hail in many areas, near drought
in the southeastern counties, wet and
soggy fields for cultivating and har-
vesting, low temperatures, and
threats of freezes before the crops
matured. While the best efforts of
some farmers were not enough to
offset the ravage of the weather,
most farmers had a good crop sea-
son. For the state as a whole, per
acre yields of most crops were above
average although yields were gener-
ally lower than last year.
Total crop production this year
will be below last year and in many
cases under average because of re-
ductions in acreage for many crops.
In some instances the quality of the
crop may not be as good as hoped
for because of the poor harvesting
conditions. This is particularly true
for the first cutting of hay, and the
threat of soft corn still existed in
early November.
November 1 estimates for the
state's crop of corn for grain re-
mained at the October 1 figure of a
little over 100 million bushels. Yields
per acre average 64 bushels compared
with the record of 73 bushels last
year. Grain corn production is now
expected to be 17 percent below last
year but 1 percent above average.
Weather conditions through the first
three weeks were generally good for
late crops but much of the corn was
still unpicked because of high mois-
ture content.
Some farmers picked corn in Octo-
ber while others plowed and a few
cut another crop of hay. Harvesting
of fall potatoes was practically com-
pleted by the first of November, and
a record yield of 230 hundredweight
per acre is indicated. Reduced acre-
ages from last year resulted in a
Wisconsin potato crop 8 percent be-
low last year although 40 percent
above average.
Hay was abundant on most farms
Weather Summary, October 1962
Temperature        Precipitation
Station                         . _
Superior       10   82  48 46.6   0.84 2.18 -0.95
Spooner -       9   80  49 47.5   1.66 1.82 +0. 59
Park Fall.     11   79  47 45.9   2.30 2.25 -2.09
Rhinelander    15   79  49 46.6   1.55 2.29 -3.10
Medford--to         79  48 46.7   1.42 2.15 -3.12
Marinette      24   73  52 50.7   1.38 2.23 +4.92
Antigo ..      14   78  49 47.8   1.62 2.25 +0.27
Amery          15   81   51 48.4  1.73 1.80 +7.95
River Falls    18   83  52 49.3   1.76 1.9 +5.00
LaCrosse       18   85  53 51.1   2.24 2.19  1.07
Hatfield Dam.   5   84  51 49.1   1.73 2.25 +0. 52
Marshfield ---  12  79  49 47.8   3.01 2.40 +3.33
Hancock  -      8   80  SI 49.6   3.00 2.32 +0.76
Oshkosh --     20   81  52 50.8   3.07 1.87 +1.60
Green Bay      22   80  51 48.4   1.94 1.91 +2.53
Portage ---    18   82  54 52.4   2.01 2.05 -4.91
Sheboygan  .   24   81  54 51.7   3.62 2.32 +2.68
Manitowoc-     23   80  52 51.0   3.35 2.13 -1.87
Lancaster      17   84  53 52.4   2.55 2.43 +2.84
Darlington  -  12   86  54 51.3   1.87 2.45 +1.21
Hillsboro  -   14   82  51 50.1   2.59 2.24 -3.27
Madison        16   82  52 50.4   1.68 2.21 -5.98
Beloit -       21   85  56 53.8   1.63 2.39  8.48
LakeGeneva     19   82   54 53.2  1.44 2.13  5.85
Milwaukee
(airport)--  22   81   53 50.0  2.14 2.10 -4.71
Average for
25 stationsa- 15.9 81.1 51.4 49.7  2.09 2.17 -0.44
this year but harvesting         was a prob-
lem throughout most of the season.
While some of the crop probably was
of poor quality, total production
reached a near record of more than
91/2 million tons-a crop 6 percent
above last year and 14 percent more
than average. Green feed for milk
cows was generally abundant except
for the southeastern counties with
plenty of hay for chopping and ample
pasture feed throughout most of the
summer.
United States Crops
Late growing crops reached full
maturity before killing frosts in late
October and added to earlier pro-
duction prospects. Corn led the up-
swing, partially offsetting declines in
other crops. The crop of corn for
grain is now estimated at 2 percent
above the October 1 figure and
slightly      less   than   th _1.. 1   'V     A
record yield of 62 .4 0194               e
is indicated.                                      E   u
DLUE 17 3'90/
tEGISLA fIYE
*FFWkU l 4ibAItW
I
STATC lMi
C. A. Hinpst_ Aj


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