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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLI ([covers January 1962/December 1962])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLI, no. 6,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.8 MB)


Page [1]


,Fl
Wisconsin
) Crop and Livestock Reporter
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                           WISCONSIN
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Statistical Reporting Service                                  Division of
Agricultural Statistics
Federal - State Crop Reporting Service
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge               C. A. Hines, A88t. In Charge    
     E. W. Morehead, Editor
Agricultural Statisticians
V. C Struck,   G. N. Tucker, Jr.,  A. Sturges,  A. D. Richardson,  N. L.
Brereton,  H. M. Spray, Jr.
Vol. XLI, No. 6                 State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin       
               June 1962
AY AND PASTURE conditions
for the state as a whole were
above June 1, 1961 and averaged the
highest on record for the date. But
rains and soggy fields in many parts
of the state during early June kept
farmers from haying and other field
work.
Field work was seriously delayed in
the northern part of the state in late
May and early June. Little corn was
in by June 1 and there were still some
oats to be sown.
Except for the dry area in south-
eastern Wisconsin, rains prevented
farmers from harvesting their excel-
lent first crop of hay. The condition
of the hay crop for the state as a
whole was 99 percent of normal for
June 1, but harvesting was mostly for
green feed.
Excellent pastures contributed to
making Wisconsin the nation's fore-
most grassland. Pasture conditions on
June 1 averaged 98 percent of normal
for the date compared with only 79
percent a year ago. While green feed
is abundant on most Wisconsin farms,
supplies are more limited in other
areas of the nation.
Hay and pasture crops suffered
from high temperatures and limited
moisture supplies during May over
most of the Eastern Corn Belt, North
and South Atlantic, and South Cen-
tral States. The condition of hay on
June 1 for the nation was 83 percent
of normal and pastures averaged 78
percent.
Much of the corn was in by June 1
in the southern part of the state, and
many fields had been cultivated for
the first time by the second week of
the month. The cool, wet weather
early in the month left many corn
fields with a better growth of weeds
than corn.
For the nation, farmers made rapid
progress in planting the 1962 corn
crop, and by June 1 were ahead of
schedule. About 15 percent of the
acreage was cultivated by June 1.
Seeding of oats was well advanced.
Farmers in the Eastern Corn Belt re-
ported early heading and short straw,
but crop conditions were good in the
West North Central Area.
Condition of Crops on June I
Wisconsin  United State.
Crop           10-yr.     lo-yr.
1962 1961  as.  1962 1961  ar
1951-      1951-
60         60
As percent of total
Rye           95 90 90 84 88 83
All hay --- ---- 99  83  88  83  85  84
Alfalfa hay    99  84  89  87  86  86
Clover and timothy hay  99  81  86  82  87  86
Wild hay      95 85 87 83 79 80
Pasture       98  79  86  78  84  84
Milk Output Continues
Above Last Spring
Wisconsin dairy herds produced
1,855 million pounds of milk in May
and 8,271 million pounds in the first
five months of this year. Milk produc-
tion in May was 3 percent above May
last year and 4 percent more than
average for the month. So far this
Weather Summary, May 1962
Station
Superior
Spooner
Park Falls
Rhinelander
Medford ---
Marinette -
Antigo -
Amery -
River Falls-
La Crosse
Hatfield Dam.
Marshfield
Hancock   -
Oshkosh -
Green Bay
Portage
Sheboygan
Manitowoc
Lancaster
Darlington
Hillsboro-
Madison -
Beloit
Lake Geneva
Milwaukee
(airport)
Average for
25 stations
Temperature
25
28
32
33
32
33
32
32
35
40
29
35
33
35
36
36
37
36
37
37
34
36
38
35
33
34.0
89
86
86
87
83
91
86
85
89
88
88
84
88
87
86
88
85
83
88
89
90
87
92
93
89
l7.5
49
59
58
59
59
62
59
61
63
64
64
59
62
62
60
64
57
57
64
64
63
61
67
64
59
60.8
8
6
Z
49.6
55. 4
53.3
53.
54.2
55.3
55. 1
56.3
57.3
59. 2
56.9
55. 3
57.
56.
54. 3
59.6
53. 5
54.1
59.1
58 0
57.4
56.1
60.2
57.8
53.4
56.C
Precipitation
S£
L.
4.58
5.82
4.59
4.00
3.78
4.1
.6 3
6.43
3.70
4.13
4. 22
3.29
2 50
2.80
4.02
1.97
1.61
6.33
3.76
2.85
3.01
2. 00
3.49
2. 13
3.83
a
I
3.84
3.37
3.52
3.50
4.03
3.09
3.50
3.55
3.84
3.76
4.04
3. 79
3 81
2.95
3.06
3.22
3.12
2. 83
3.85
3.69
3.64
3.34
3.59
3.69
3.16
3.51
+1.94
+I.56
+1 .01
2.51
±2.86
+2 .05
+0.42
+1.86
1.42
+0 27
+0 21
0.53
0.55
+0.74
-t0.09
0.36
2.07
+2.20
-1.23
--2.27
1.54
-4,48
1.00
1.36
0.27
year, the state's dairy herds have
produced nearly 4 percent more milk
than during the first five months of
1961.
The state's milk cows produced 15
percent of the nation's May milk pro-
duction. Dairy herds in the nation
produced 12,533 million pounds of
milk in May and 54,721 million pounds
in the first five months of this year.
The nation's milk output was up only
1 percent from May last year and
showed a gain of less than 1 percent
over the average May production. So
far this year, the nation's dairy herds
have produced 2 percent more milk
than in the first five months of last
year.
Egg Production Up in May
Compared with a Year Ago
Wisconsin farm flocks laid 5 per-
cent more eggs during May than a
year earlier. But, this output was 12
percent less than the 1956-60 average
for the month. Egg production in the
state for the firsftt3 loT tbI;
JULy,        :9uz
IN THIS ISSUE
June Crop Report
Condition of the state's
hay and pasture is excellent.
In many areas of the state
corn is being cultivated for
the first time this season.
Milk Production
Wisconsin milk production
is running almost 4 percent
ahead of last year. Lush pas-
ture should help maintain the
high production level.
Egg Production
More layers and an in-
crease in production per
layer boosted May egg pro-
duction 5 percent above May
of last year. Nationally,
1962 egg production is run-
ning slightly above 1961.
1961 Dairy Products
The final summary of the
1961 annual dairy manufac-
tures reports show a number
of interesting changes in
product output.
Current Trend Charts
.
.                   .             ,
. . , . .
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