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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLI ([covers January 1962/December 1962])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLI, no. 3,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.8 MB)


Page [1]


STT DOorN
STATE DOCUMVENYt
LEGISLATIVE
Wisconsin                     REFER.;.;    lk
Crop and Livestock ImompnoNSIN
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE               WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE
StatIstical Repeoting  Service                      Division of Agricultural
Statistics
Federal - State Crop Reporting Service
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge
G. N. Tucker, Jr.
V. C. Struck,
C. A. Hines, Asst. In Charge
Agricultural Statisticians
A. Sturges,   A. D. Richardson,
E. W. Morehead, Editor
N. L. Brereton   H. M. Spray, Jr.
Vol. XLI, No. 3               State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin         
        March 1962
RESTLESSLY AWAITING spring,
RWisconsin's winter-weary farmers
spent some time during early March
reporting their planting plans to the
Wisconsin Crop Reporting Service.
Farmers making these reports were
cooperating in the annual nation-
wide March Intentions-to-Plant Sur-
vey made by the Department of Ag-
riculture. The purpose of this survey
is to assist growers generally in mak-
ing such changes in their acreage
plans as may appear desirable, and it
is made well ahead of planting time.
Estimates of prospective acreages
for 14 crops with comparisons with
last year and average for both Wis-
consin and the nation may be found
on page 2.
Wisconsin farmers intend to have
larger acreages than a year ago for
corn, rye, hay, and peas for process-
ing. Smaller acreages are indicated
for oats, barley, winter wheat, tobacco,
and soybeans. No acreage changes
from a year ago are anticipated for
spring wheat, flax, potatoes, sugar
beets, and onions. Only the acreages
of corn, potatoes, and soybeans may
be above average while sharp de-
creases are indicated for the acreages
of a number of crops.
Wisconsin farmers intend to plant
5 percent more acres of corn than a
year ago. If these plans are carried
out the corn acreage will be 2 per-
cent above average. The total acreage
sown to small grains this year will
be smaller than a year ago with de-
creases of 2 percent for oats, 12 per-
cent for both barley and winter
wheat more than offsetting a larger
rye acreage and no changes indicated
for spring wheat, and flax.
Farmers in the state intend to have
2 percent more acres of hay for har-
vest than in 1961, but the acreage
will be about average. The net change
in the prospective acres to be used
for corn, oats, and hay will be an in-
crease of about 160,000 acres.
The nation's farmers intend to
plant a total of 306 million acres for
1962 harvest. If these plans are car-
ried out, the 1962 planted acreage will
be the smallest on record. The plant-
ing plans were reported during the
sign up period for the 1962 Feed
Grain and Wheat programs, and the
present intentions may be changed
relative to participation in the 1962
programs.
However, when the March reports
were made, the nation's farmers ex-
pect to up their corn acreage by
nearly 4 percent but reduce the oat
acreage by 6 percent. An increase of
1 percent is indicated for the hay
acreage.
State's Cash Farm Income
Set New Record in 1961
Cash income from products sold by
Wisconsin farmers last year totaled
4 percent more than in 1960 and was
the highest on record.
Of the 1,15314 million dollars re-
ceived for products sold last year,
Wisconsin farmers received more than
1,022 million dollars from livestock
and livestock products and over 131
Weather Summary, February 1962
Station
Superior
Spooner.
Park Falls ----
Rhinelander,-
Medford---
Marinette --
Antigo   .
Amery-    -
River Falls --
La Crosses--
Hatfield Dam.
Marshfield --
Hancock.
Oshkosh   .
Green Bay..
Portage.
Sheboygan -
Manitowoc...
Lancaster -
Darlington.----
Hillsboroe-----
Madison--.
Beloit.
Lake Geneva
Milwaukee
(airport)
Average for
25 stations
Temperature
6
-30
-29
-30
-25
-16
-20
-26
-22
-17
-31
-19
-21
-13
-17
-10
-5
-1f3
-10
-12
-20
-9
-8
6
-17.0
44
40
39
39
36
41
39
38
40
47
48
35
45
44
37
52
47
42
48
SO
49
46
51
53
48
14.0
12
13
11
12
13
18
14
12
Is
17
1s
14
14
16
14
20
22
19
20
21
17
17
22
22
21
16.4
a
14.1
14.2
14.1
15.2
21.4
17.2
14.1
16.3
19.4
17.6
16.6f
18.1
20.1
17.6
22.4
22.5
23.0
22.3
23.1
20.4
20.6
25.3
24.0
22.4
19.2
Precipitation
0
1.-71
1.1
1.71
1.61
1.21
3. 05
1I.9!
.21
1.8
2. 26
1.72-4
2.02
1 .N
2.96
1.83
1.85
1.64
1.6E
1.39
0.59
2.04
1.74
a
0
0.80
0.64
0.97
0.00
1.07
0.09
0.92
0.77
0.02
0.e5
0.80
0.99
0.95
1.17
1.08
1.18
I.SI
I.43
1.06
1.03
1.09
1.13
0.25
0.26
1.40:
1.07
+0.88
+0.29
+0.55
+0.06
-0.58
+1.70
+0.3S
+0.08
+0.21
-.23
+0.27
+0.57
-0.06
+0.62
+1.86
+0.17
+1.97
+0.35
+0.03
+0.34
0.34
+0.02
-0.51
+1.59
+1.29
+0.42
million dollars from the sale of crops.
Income from both these major sources
was higher than in 1960.
An additional sum of a little more
than 40 million dollars was received
by the state's farmers as government
payments. Receipts from   products
sold and government payments
boosted the total cash farm income in
1961 to 6 percent above the previous
year.
Standing alone, the fact of a rec-
ord cash income is impressive. But
much of the rosy tint fades when cash
income trends are compared with
other economic changes that have
taken place in the state's agriculture
since 1950.
Practically everyone is aware of
the great changes in agriculture dur-
ing the past decade that have boosted
physical production on Wisconsin
farms to a level hardly dreamed of
a generation ago. Contributing to the
increased farm production are greater
use of fertilizer, farm3qewiMl Set-
ter seed and breedinglteek, and the
-I'J .
. O :    L
IN THIS ISSUE
Spring Planting Plans
Wisconsin farmers intend
to plant a larger corn acre-
age than a year ago but re-
duce the oat acreage. There
will be a little larger acre-
age of hay for harvest.
Milk Production
Milk production is higher
than a year ago for both
state and nation.
Egg Production
Farm laying flocks in the
state produced about the
same number of eggs in
the two months of this year
as they did a year ago.
Prices Farmers Receive and Pay
The index of prices re-
ceived by the state's farm-
ers in February was down
1 percent from a year ago.
Cash Farm Income
Cash income from prod-
ucts sold by Wisconsin
farmers last year was the
highest on record.
Current Trend Charts
-
I _
., _, _
,_
, _
-
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