University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLI ([covers January 1962/December 1962])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLI, no. 2,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.7 MB)


Page [1]


STATE DOCUMENT
LEG'SLATIVE
W     iscon           *in             REFERECE l: LU&B.>%RY
W*iscz o n si* n                   MADISON 2, WISCONS1N
) Crop and Livestock Reporter
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                       WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE
Statistical Reporting  Service                              Division of Agricultural
StatIstics
Federal - State Crop Reporting Service
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge            C. A. Hines, A88t. In Charge       
 E. W. Morehead, Editor
Agricultural Statisticians
G. N. Tucker, Jr.    V. C. Struck,    A. Sturges,     A. D. Richardson, 
   B. A. Nelson
Vol. XLI, No. 2               State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin         
      February 1962
TIVESTOCK INVENTORY figures
'for January    1 show   Wisconsin
farmers had the largest number of
cattle for the date since 1956 although
milk cow numbers have remained un-
changed for the past three years.
The inventory also shows that the
number of swine and turkeys was
larger than a year ago while de-
creases from January 1 last year oc-
curred in the number of sheep and
lambs and chickens. Changes in live-
stock numbers and farm prices per
head from a year ago resulted in an
increase of 1 percent in the total value
of all livestock on Wisconsin farms on
January 1.
Of the 4,339,000 head of cattle on
Wisconsin farms at the beginning of
the year, 2,420,000 were cows and
heifers 2 years old and over kept for
milk cows. While this number is the
same as for January 1960 and 1961,
there has been an upswing in the
numbers of heifers and heifer calves
being saved for milk cows. The 671,-
000 heifers 1 to 2 years old kept for
milk cows is the largest for any Jan-
uary 1 since 1954 and the number of
heifer calves is the highest on record
for the date. There are also more
cows and heifers and heifer calves not
kept for milk than a year ago. But
the number of steers and bulls a year
old or over is smaller.
The farm prices per head for milk
cows and all cattle show no change
from January 1 last year resulting in
little change in the total farm value
of all cattle. The value of Wisconsin's
milk cows at the beginning of the
year is estimated at nearly 5521/2 mil-
lion dollars or about three-fourths of
the 755 million dollars estimated as
the farm value of all cattle.
Wisconsin farmers had 1,857,000
head of swine on farms at the begin-
ning of the year or 4 percent more
than a year ago. This increase results
mostly from a larger number of pigs
under 6 months of age being raised
from the record-high fall pig crop.
The farm value of the swine on farms
at the beginning of the year is esti-
mated at 53 million dollars or a little
more than 2 million dollars above a
year ago.
The number of sheep and lambs on
the state's farms on January 1 was
the lowest for the date since records
began in 1920. There were only 246,-
000 sheep and lambs on farms with a
farm value of a little over 3 million
dollars.
January 1 estimates show the num-
ber of chickens on Wisconsin farms
continues to decrease with the 10,211,-
000 birds this year 4 percent below
the number a year ago. With chicken
prices unusually low and the reduction
in number, the farm value of the birds
is estimated at about 11'4 million
dollars or 8 percent less than a year
ago. Turkey numbers turned upward
but are well below the record 1959 in-
ventory. The value of the turkeys on
farms is estimated at a little over
1 million dollars and shows a drop of
21 percent from January 1 last year
as a result of substantially lower
prices.
Total value of all livestock and
poultry on Wisconsin farms at the
beginning of this year is estimated at
a little more than 824 million dollars
Weather Summary, January 1962
Station
Superior
Spooner
Park Falls --
Rhinelander- -
Medford
Marinette -
Antigo --
Amery
River Falls
La Crosse
Hatfield Dam.
Marshfield
Hancock -
Oshkosh -
Green Bay
Portage -
Sheboygan
Manitowoc -
Lancaster -
Darlington
Hillsboro-
Madison -
Beloit -
Lake Geneva
Milwaukee
(airport)
Average for
25 stations
Temperature
1i
-31
-32
-31
- 28
29
22
25
3I
-27
16
-33
27
23
I9
-23
-13
-17
-15
-20
-21
18
-14
17
-12
22.4
41
44
38
38
40
40
40
44
42
43
46
37
44
39
40
46
40
40
41
41
43
40
38
44
39
41.1
7
7
7
8
14
10
7
13
13
9
1 1
12
I I
15
17
14
13
14
13
12
16
15
15
11.6
|I
12.9
12.4
12.7
13.1
13.5
20.4
16.1
12. 3
13.3
15.7
15.2
14.8
16.5
19.0
16.1
20.6
19.9
18.2
19.1
23.3
2 1. 8
21.9
17.3
Precipitation
aI
W.
0.88
0,50
0.90
0.67
0.47
1.30
0.51
0.58
0.66
0.19
0.25
0.50
0.43
1.36
1.27
0.85
2.15
1.41
0.53
1.06
0.21
1.12
1.41
2.99
2.48
0.99
E
A
1. Of
0.81
I Is
1.32
1,31
1.58
1.31
0.81
1.0
1.22
0.99
1. 31
1.06
1.42
1.29
1.48
1. 77
1.53
1.32
1.39
1.23
1.31
1.64
1.96
1.58
1.32
E t '
Z2  .
8    .
--C .
i0.18
-0.31
0.29
-0.66
-0.89
F 0.29
0.79
0.23
Z0.34
1.03
0.74
0.81
0.63
0.06
0.02
0.63
+0. 38
0.12
0.79
0.31
1 .02
0.19
0.23
+1.03
+0.90
0.33
with the value of milk cows alone ac-
counting for two-thirds of the total.
State Milk Production
Sets Record for January
Milk production in both Wisconsin
and the United States as 1962 began
set all-time highs for January.
With about the same number of
milk cows, but a record output per
cow, Wisconsin milk production was
4 percent above a year ago and 17
percent higher than the 10-year aver-
age for the month. Along with 1959,
this is only the second time over 11/½
billion pounds of milk have been pro-
duced in the state during January.
Milk production on the nation's
farms during January is estimated at
10,118 million pounds and shows a 3
percent gain compared with January
1961 and a 10 percent increase over
the 10-year average for the month.
Wisconsin produced 15 percent of the
milk in the country in January.
The quantity of grains and concen-
trates fed per coy 1T Yiseo04r1fvrmPs
[Vie .  9   1 9;
1.- -F....
IN THIS ISSUE
1962 Livestock Inventory
State's farmers have more
cattle, swine, and turkeys,
but fewer sheep and lambs
and chickens than a year
ago.
Milk Production
The year began with more
milk produced on farms than
in January 1961.
Egg Production
Egg production in the
state was down from Janu-
ary last year but up for the
nation.
Prices Farmers Receive and Pay
Wisconsin's index of farm
product prices in January
was off 1 percent from a
year ago with lower prices
for milk, poultry, and eggs
more than offsetting higher
crop and meat animal
prices.
Current Trend Charts
I
=
l 1.1
. . . .
X
Mr
3
E
I
A
.


Go up to Top of Page