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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XL ([covers January 1961/December 1961])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XL, no. 9,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.7 MB)


Page [1]


STATS AScYY-!NT            RECE9         EO
L E G                    ¢<0C    1A 1961
ea                                 AIOISLATIVE
vW;  j %RVAJ                      -RENCE LIBRARY
Crop and Livestock Reporter
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                        WISCONSIN
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Statistical Reporting  Service                              Division  of
Agricultural Statistics
Federal - State Crop Reporting Service
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge             C. A. Hines, Asst. In Charge      
  E. W. Morehead, Edit&
Agricultural Statisticians
G. N. Tucker. Jr.   - V. C. Struck,   A. Sturges,      A. D. Richardson,
   B. A. Nelson
r
Vol. XL, No. 9               State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin          
   September 1961
IN THIS ISSUE
September Crop Report
Wisconsin's crop of corn
for grain this year may be 1
percent above the 1960 har-
vest because of the record-
breaking yields per acre.
The nation's corn crop is
forecast at 10 percent below
last year.
Milk Production
Milk production on Wis-
consin farms during August
set a record for the month
even though pasture feed
supplies were short. So far
this year dairy herds have
produced about as much
milk as during the first eight
months of 1960.
Egg Production
Egg production on Wis-
consin farms in August con-
tinued below a year ago,
but the nation's farm flocks
laid more eggs than in Au-
gust last year.
Prices Farmers Receive and Pay
Wisconsin's index of prices
received by farmers for prod-
ucts sold in August was 4
percent above a year ago,
and the index of prices paid
was close to the record-high.
Current Trends
Stocks of butter and Amer-
ican cheese in cold storage
in the nation are above a
year ago and average. Pro-
duction of both products in
July was above a year ago.
THE RECORD-BREAKING corn
yield highlights Wisconsin's Sep-
tember crop forecasts.
If the present forecast holds true,
Wisconsin's yields of corn for grain
will average 72 bushels per acre com-
pared with 62Y2 bushels last year and
the average of 59½ bushels. And the
state's farmers may harvest more
than 110 million bushels of corn for
grain. The crop is expected to be 1
percent above last year although the
acreage is 12 percent below the one
harvested in 1960.
While August was hot and rainfall
was below normal for the state as a
whole, prospects for some crops im-
proved during the month. Higher
yields than a month earlier are indi-
cated in the September report for
corn, oats, barley, spring wheat, and
fall potatoes. Prospects for the com-
mercial apple crop also improved.
The September forecast shows Wis-
consin tied for first place with Illinois
in oat yields with the average of 55
bushels per acre. The state's oat crop
is expected to total nearly 12012 mil-
lion bushels and be 16 percent larger
than a year ago but 11 percent below
average. Barley production of nearly
1½ million bushels this year is about
a fourth larger than the crop har-
vested in 1960 but only two-fifths of
the average production. Barley yields
are expected to average 45 bushels per
acre.
More Potatoes This Year
Because of a large acreage for har-
vest this year, Wisconsin's potato
crop may be 4 percent larger than the
one produced last year and 31 percent
above average. Prospects for the fall
crop improved during August with a
boost of 1,000 pounds per acre.
Tame hay production this year will
fall short of the record 1960 crop by
22 percent with production now esti-
mated at a little over 71/2 million tons.
While many farmers reported skimpy
second cuttings, some farmers said
their fields produced good crops on the
third harvest. The dry weather which
reduced hay production also cut pas-
ture feed supplies. Pasture conditions
for the state as a whole averaged only
71 percent of normal on September 1
compared with 84 percent a year ago.
While prospects for the cabbage
Weather Summary, August 1961
Station
Superior-
Spooner
Park Falls ---
Rhinelander. -
Medford --
Marinette -
Antigo ---
Amery -
River Falls ...
La Crosse ---
Hatfield Dam
Marshfield
Haneock:- --
Oshkosh---
Green Bay.---
Portage
Sheboygan
Manitowoc- _
Lancaster ---
Darlington --
Hillsboro---.
Madison-
Beloit ----
Lake Geneva.
Milwaukee
(airport)--
Average for
25 stations
Temperature
r
.~
35    96   69
39    93   70
41    89   67
47    88   68
45    87   67
47    92   71
48    89  68
45    91   70
47    92   71
52    93   73
40    91   71
45    87   67
47    90   70
47    92   70
47    91   68
S0    94   72
53    96   71
48    94   68
51    91   72
46    91   70
45    93   71
45    93   69
52    91   72
49    93   72
48    94   70
46.4 91.6 69.1
a
16.2
17. 8
1565
16.8
19.5
67.0
18.C
19. 3
71.4
58.6
17.5
69.
70.7
67.8
71.1
70.1
69.1
71.6
70.A
69.4
70.
72. !
71.
69.1
69.:
Precipitation
I   i
Z E
1.82 4.00
1.22 3.91
3.05 4.40
3.50 3.80
2.13 4. I
2.04 3. 04
3.09 3.79
2.2S 3.69
2.71 3.29
1.39 3.29
6.62 3.46
3.27 3.90
5.46 3.03
3.90 3.18
2.84 3.03
2.03 3.33
1.73 3.00
2.46 3.02
2.05 3.60
1.74 4. 2
1.97 3.46
1.78 Z.08
2.71 3.80
2.67 3.5
2.35 2.6;
2.67 3.54
E -
-1.14
- 5 53
4.25
2.77
4.85
+ 1.83
+ 0.77
0.45
2.35
5.02
+ 0.79
1 .42
+ 0.99
0.13
;2.81
3.18
3.76
6.75
3.92
3.3 1
- 4.73
2.97
l-1.93
1.42
2. 29
crop are below last year, larger crops
of carrots and commercial onions are
in prospect. Increased production of
vegetables for processing are indi-
cated with larger crops than a year
ago expected for beets, green lima
beans, peas, snap beans, and sweet
corn. Except for green lima beans
there are larger acreages for harvest.
Tobacco production this year may
total nearly 221/2 million pounds or
close to last year's crop. Increased
production is indicated for type 54 but
this may be offset by a smaller crop
of type 55.
The fruit crops are making a better
showing than last year with larger
crops estimated for cherries, cranber-
ries, and commercial apples. The
strawberry crop was smaller this year.
Wisconsin growers expect their sec-
ond largest crop of cranberries with
an increase in production over a year
ago of 12 percent. The season is about
10 days later than usual. Cranberry
production is now forecast at 425,000
barrels. This year's cranberry crop
I
L__


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