University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XL ([covers January 1961/December 1961])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XL, no. 6,   pp. [1]-8 PDF (3.9 MB)


Page [1]


#T.S1.,gas-^--MENT
Wisconsin
ssonsn wish>, . Am ~L13BRARY
0        Crop          and         Livestock                 R     *mI.VONS)N
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                 WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE
Statistical Reporting  Service                        Division of Agricultural
Statistics
Federal - State Crop Reporting Service
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge
C. A. Hines, Amt. In Charge
Aariculturm Statisticians
E. W. Morehead, Editor
G. N. Tucker, Jr.     V. C. Struck,     A. Sturges,      A. D. Richardson,
     B. A. Nelson
Vol. XL, No. 6                  State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin       
               June 1961
IN THIS ISSUE
May Crop Report
Dry weather in Wisconsin
has slowed growth of hay
and pastures, but farmers
are ahead of last spring
with their field work.
Milk Production
Estimates for both the
state and nation show little
change in milk production
during May and the first five
months of this year com-
pared with the same periods
of last year.
Egg Production
Egg production on farms
of both the state and nation
continues below a year ago.
Prices Farmers Receive and Pay
The increase over a year
ago in the average price
received for milk was the
bright spot in the May re-
port of prices received by
the state's farmers.
Current Trends
Cold storage stocks in the
nation on May 1 included
more butter, cheese, and
poultry than a year earlier
but holdings of eggs were
much smaller.
Features
Age of Milk Cows
Oat Varieties
1960 Dairy Products
State Population Maps
Forest Products Prices
More Pheasants
On State's Farms
DM IC r It I It' r r.
s N W O I V 1
JUL 20 1961
LEGISLATIV\
DRY WEATHER has slowed the
growth of hay and pasture in
Wisconsin this spring but helped the
farmers get their corn and oats in
well ahead of a year ago.
Reports from Wisconsin farmers on
June 1 indicate pasture conditions
averaged only 79 percent of normal
compared with 93 percent of normal
a year ago and the average for the
month of 85 percent. Lack of rain in
early June continued to slow pasture
growth and farmers are feeding more
than the usual amounts of other
roughage to their cattle.
Predictions that the first cutting of
hay will be much smaller than a year
ago are common. Haymaking is slow
in getting started this spring, but
farmers expect higher quality hay
from the first crop than they had last
spring. The condition of hay on June 1
was 83 percent of normal compared
with 90 percent last year. Lack of
rain reduced prospects for the crop
this year.
Clover and timothy has made less
progress than has alfalfa. The condi-
tion of alfalfa on June 1 was 84 per-
cent of normal compared with 81 per-
cent for clover and timothy. The con-
dition of both crops on June 1 last
year was 90 percent of normal. The
condition figures for both hay and
pasture on June 1 were below average
for the date.
Condition of Crops on June I
Crop
Rye
All hay -
Alfalfa hay
Clover and timothy
hay  -
Wild hay
Pasturs.-
Wisconsin      United States
10-yr.           l0-yr.
1961 1960   av.  1961 1960   av.
1950.            1950-
59               59
As percent of normal
90   90    89    88   88
83   90    86    85   87
84   90    88    86  89
81   90    85    87  90
85   88    87    79  84
79   93    85    84  87
83
84
85
86
79
84
While growth of hay and pasture
lags behind last year, farmers have
been able to get in their crops much
earlier this spring. The excessive
rains of last spring which promoted
the growth of grasses left fields wvet
and soggy well into summer. Now the
oats are in and up while last year
Weather Summary, May 1961
Station
Superior
Spooner
Park Falls --
Rhinelander-
Medford ---
Marinette ---
Antigo-
Amery
River Falls. -
La Crosse----
Wis. Rapids..
Marshfield
Hancock
Oshkosh-
Green Bay-
Portage
Sheboygan
Manitowoc
Lancaster ----
Darlington
Hillsboro
Madison
Beloit
Lake Geneva
Milwaukee
(airport)
Average for
25 stations
Temperature
21    86   50
22    83   52
26    82   50
25    83   52
25    81   52
25    83   55
24    84   53
25    86   54
27    85   56
32     87  48
27    87   54
25    90   53
20    86   54
26    83   54
27    86   53
28    85   57
30    82   53
27    78   48
28    85   56
26    86   56
26    85   55
25    84   54
31    88   58
27    89   56
27    80   51
26.1 84.6 53.4
~11
8
69.6
55.5
53. 4
S3.1!
54.2
55.2
55.2
56.1
57.2
59.1
56. 1
57.1
56.1
54.4
59.6
53.1
54.1
59.A
57.1
57.3
57.!
s0.1
57.1
54.3
56.1
Precipitation
c
5.6
3.74
3.79
2.67
2.65
2.17
2.71
3.64
5.15
2.37
2. 08
22.88
2. 25
2. 21
1.42
2.08
1.40
1.25
1.82
1.72
2.71
1.17
1.63
1.58
1.25
2.48
I
4.16
3.21
3.9S
3.48
3.96
2.71
3.46
3.42
3.81
3.22
3.69
3.69
3.58
2.64
2.53
3.02
2.99
2.63
3.73
3.51
3.41
3.22
3.41
3.59
2.91
3.3f
*1-
| Iii
+ S.97
1+ 1.32
- 0.24
1.87
-2.48
-0.27
-0.25
+ 0.37
+ 0.40
- 1.12
-0.95
-0.72
+ 0.13
- 0.54
- 3.00
- 1.97
- 1.60
- 3.40
-3.01
- 2.13
- 0.22
- 3.08
- 1.80
-0.64
+ 0.06
- 0.84
sonie farmers were just finishing
their oat seedings.
And at the beginning of June last
year only 43 percent of the acreage
intended for corn was planted com-
pared with 84 percent this year.
However, corn planting by June 1
this year does not show the usual
progress, particularly in the northern
counties.
Wisconsin Corn Planted by June '
District      1961    1960    1959   Normal
As percent of total
Northwest          72       46      83      89
North              78       19      78      87
Northeast           76      24      78      84
West..              89      54     92       93
Central .          76      46       76      85
East -             81       11     67       82
Southwest          91       53      87      93
South              87       55      89      89
Southeast           83      27      83      84
State.            84.4    42.6    83.4    88.2
' As reported by crop corrcspondents.
I
-


Go up to Top of Page