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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XL ([covers January 1961/December 1961])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XL, no. 2,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.8 MB)


Page [1]


W163
4  0~
Wisconsin
AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
MADISON 6, WISCONSIN
Crop and Livestock Reporter
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                              WISCONSIN
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Marketing Service                                     Division
of Agricultural Statistics
Federal - State Crop Reporting Service
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge                 C. A. Hines, Asst. In Charge  
         E. W. Morehead, Edito
Agricultural Statisticians
G. N. Tucker. Jr..      A. Sturges,       V. C. Struck,        L. E. Krahn,
        B. A. Nelson
r
Vol. XL, No. 2               State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin          
  February 1961
IN THIS ISSUE
1961 Uvestock Inventory
The January 1 count of
livestock on Wisconsin farms
shows increases over a year
ago for milk cows, all cat-
tle, all sheep and lambs,
and turkeys. The number of
all swine and chickens is
lower than a year ago.
Milk Production
January milk production
on forms of the state and
nation is only slightly more
than a year ago but is well
above average for the
month.
Egg Production
Egg production on Wis-
consin farms in January was
off 9 percent from a year
ago because of a reduction
in the number of layers and
a lower production per
layer.
Prices Farmers Receive
and Pay
Wisconsin's index of
prices received by farmers
in January is up 9 percent
from a year ago. The index
of prices paid by farmers
rose more than 1 percent to
set a new record for the
month.
Current Trends
Wisconsin farmers can
buy 9 percent more dairy
ration with the value of a
hundred pounds of milk
than a year ago. Employ-
ment and industrial produc-
tion is down from a year
ago but total personal in-
come is higher according to
index figures.
Feature
Livestock Marketings
Larger in 1960
THE ANNUAL COUNT of live-
Tstock on farms January 1 shows
Wisconsin and New York the only
two major dairy states in the nation
with more milk cows than a year ago.
For the nation, the number of milk
cows is 1 percent smaller than a year
ago and at the lowest level for any
January since 1909.
This livestock inventory could not
have been made without the help of
thousands of farmers and the rural
mail carriers. Blanks for reporting
livestock numbers were distributed to
farmers by the rural mail carriers
who returned the farmers' reports to
the Department of Agriculture.
Wisconsin's January livestock in-
ventory also shows larger totals for
all cattle and all sheep and lambs.
The number of all swine is down from
a year ago. The number of chickens
continues the downward trend which
began in 1955, and now is the lowest
in more than forty years. The number
of turkeys is up sharply from a year
ago. Not included in the poultry esti-
mates are commercial broilers and
turkey fryers.
The number of cows and heifers
two years old and over kept for milk
production on Wisconsin farms is up
1 percent from January 1 last year.
This marks the first upswing in milk
cow numbers following a decline be-
ginning in 1957.
Dairy Replacement Stock Up
A further increase in the state's
milk cow numbers may take place.
Increases over a year ago occurred in
the number of heifers one to two
years old and heifer calves being
saved for milk cows. The upswing in
replacement stock began in 1959 while
the number of milk cows was still
dropping.
January 1 estimates of all cattle on
Wisconsin farms show a gain of 1
percent. This is the largest number
since 1957 and reflects the upswing in
milk cow numbers. The number of
beef cattle is practically unchanged
from the January 1 inventory last
year.
Swine Numbers Down
Wisconsin farmers have 8 percent
fewer pigs under six months of age
than a year ago. The number of sows
and gilts is up about 3 percent from a
year ago but 9 percent below the
1955-59 average for January 1. All
swine on the state's farms at the be-
ginning of the year dropped 10 per-
cent from the total on January 1 last
year.
Weather Summary, January 1961
Station
Superior --
Spooner ----
Park Falls --
Rhinelander
Medlord
Marinette -
Antigo
Amery
River Falls
La Crosse --
Wis. Rapids -
Marshfield ---
Hancock   -
Oshkosh  -
Green Bay --
Portage
Sheboygan -
Manitowoc
Lancaster .
Darlington--
Hillsboro -
Madison
Beloit -
Lake Geneva
(airport). .
Average for
Z5 stations -
Temp.eature
22
25
19
18
19
14
17
22
- 21
13
16
16
21
I11
13
10
7
9
12
10
1 5
12
7
9
8
42
43
41
42
43
48
43
45
47
46
48
44
so
52
so
52
54
55S
49
51
s0
53
53
54
55
c
I I
I I
I0
I2
14
19
1s
14
15
16
i1
15
15
19
16
19
22
19
189
18
18
17
22
21
19
16.-
l
z
12.9
12.4
12.7
13.1
13.!
20.4
16.1
12.3
13.3
Is.
15.47
14.1
16.5
19.1
16.1
20.4
212.
22.3
19A.
20.4
18.2
19.
23.:
21.1
21.!
17.
Precipitation
c,
E t,
'a I 9
0.86
0.72
0.82
1.10                  I
1.24
1.18              IC
0.72
0.88
0. 95
1. 00
1.08
0.87
I .24
0.98
1.31
I .53
1.35              1 1 l
1.12
1.11               'I
0.99
5.43
1.73
1.27
*1,.11,
keep
on
otal              G a
to  2             1X1,3
the
mbs
0.20
9.09
0.37
0.23
0.11
0.35
0.12
0.09
0.12
0.27
0.14
0.23
0.19
0. 18
0.31
0.17
0.24
0.1I
0.28
0.28
0.24
0.18
0.21
0.23
0.31
0.21
E
I .0f
1.81
I . 1s
1.33
1.36
I .53
O.38
1.81C
I .0D
1.22
1.14
1.31
1.01
1 .42
I .29
1.41
I .77
lI .53
1.32
1.39
I .23
l1 6X
1.31
1 .6,
1 .94
I.S1
1.3:
Slight increases in both stock sh
and lambs and sheep and lambs
feed January 1 brought the t
number of all sheep and lambs I
percent above a year ago. But
total number of all sheep and la
is below the 1955-59 average.
Chickens Continue Decline
The number of chickens on farms
has been declining since 1955. Wis-
consin farm flocks had 2 percent
fewer birds at the beginning of this
year than a year ago, and the number
is 22 percent below the January 1955
estimate. But present estimates show
the number of turkeys up 30 percent
from January 1 last year and three
times the number at the beginning of
1955.
No Count Made for Horses
This is the first time that the num-
ber of horses has not been included in
the annual livestock inventories pub-
lished for both the state and nation.
Horse numbers have been steadily de-
clining for the past two decades. The
count last year showed about 60,000
horses on farms. This number in-
I
I
II
---
A
L.,
-14 14.^
.
M:l


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