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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIII ([covers January 1934/December 1934])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIII, no. 8,   pp. [29]-32 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [29]


J    .   j  ;  . 4   '-
WtBO I EtS. R  '. LIDRA . " _ ' ,
WISCONSIN                  I
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATIE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                          WISCONSIN
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & MARKETS
Bureau of Agricultural Economics                                     Division
of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural Statistician
S. J. GILBERT. Assistant Agricultural Statistician
Vol. XIII, No. 8                      State Capyitol, Madison, Wisconsin
                              August, 1934
LTHOUGH    Wisconsin crop condi-                                        
     will not offset the extremely low pro-
Ations, as a whole, were improved the                                   
      duction of the usual hay crops, and of
first of the month as compared to              IN    THIS     ISSUE     
        small grains. The influence of acreage
earlier in the season it was evident that                               
        changes on the production of these and
good general rains were needed during
August in order to continue develop-           August Crop Report       
              Weather Summary, July 1934
ment and to offset the effects of the ac--____________________
cumulated deficiency of subsoil mois-         August Dairy Report
ture. It was becoming dry over most             Tg rdcinDgemer aturenhi 
                                   Preiiato
of the state in early August, although         EgPouto                  
                   ere   arnet       Ice
general rains over southern Wisconsin          1934 Lamb and Wool Pro-  
                                          a
in the first week of the month tended:1.
to delay serious deterioration of grow-duio*                            
                                          a
ing crops. Rainfall over much of theduto                                
          Station                         'a-
The accumulated precipitation deficien-                                 
                              2 0
cies from January 1 to August 1 vary           Prices Received by Farmers
                                -        -
from 1.6 inches to 10 inches with most
of the state lacking from 4 to 8 inches                                 
         _____
since January 1. The moisture short-
age of this season combined with the    Ing essential. On August 1 cro0p
cor-    Duluth --.  46- 1  90 65.4 64.0 1.53 3.76 - 6.86
deficiencies of recent years has reduced  respondents placed the condition
of the  Escanaba.----46, 88 65.6 66.0 2.16 3.33 -4.20
subsoil water reserves to a low point,  state's corn crop at 85 percent of
nor,-
Weather data for July at the more im-   mal, indicating a production of 81,865,-
 Minneapolias_ 53 105 76.2 72.3 1 .40 3.73 -10.07
portant stations serving Wisconsin are  000 bushels, 26 percent above the
5-     La Croase---- 50 102 75.4 72.8 8.21 3.90 -1.62Z
shown elsewhere on this page.           year average and 5 percent greater
      Green Bay --- 52 95 71.1 70.0 2 .34 3.46 - 4.01
than the large crop of last year. The
Feed Supplies Will be Small        combined oats and barley crop will be
  Dubuque ....55 103 77.5 74.1 5.48 3.94 -6.18
but 79 million bushels, the smallest    Msdiaon ----- 55 101 75.3 72.1 3.42
3.88 -8.58
Feed grains and hay are a basic con-  total production of these two crops
in   Milwaukee_-55SlOS 72.4 70.1 1l.102.63  7.f
sideration in the state's agriculture,  14 years. The state's total tame
hay    _______________________
with more than 90 percent of the state's  production is estimated at 29 percent
crop land being devoted to the produc-  below last year's crop and is only
59   other crops is discussed in the July is-
tion of these crops. Of all Wisconsin's  percent of the 5-year average. The
    sue of this publication and acreages of
feed crops only corn, alfalfa, spring   production of rye is placed at 22
per-  important crops, in so far as present
wheat, and wild hay promise normal      cent below the 5-year average, spring
   estimates are concerned, arce given in
production. Much corn has been planted  wheat 1 percent under, and winter
       the  Wisconsin  crop  summary   table
late for forage as a substitute crop for  wheat 62 per cent less than the
5-year  shown herewith.
hay. The final outcome on the entire    average. While considerable acreage
       In the main, the cash crops of Wis-
corn  crop  rests largely  with  t h e,  has been planted to emergency hay
     consin have also made or promise com-
weather, good general rains through     crops, such as soy beans, Sudan grass,
  paratively small returns this year as
August and reasonably late frosts be-   and millet, production of these crops
   compared with last year and with the
CROP SUMMARY OF WISCONSIN FOR AUGUST 1, 1934
Acreage                          Production                         Condition
 Aug. I.
(Percent of Normal)
Percent in-                             1934 as a
crease(+) or                             percent oi  Unit               10-yr.
Crop            1934            decrease (-) Au.I 945-year              
                 1934   1933  average
(Preliminary)  1933  of 1934 acreage  loeat  1933  average  1933  5-year
                1922 31
compared to                  1927-31        average
1933 acreage
Corn.-------------      2,339.000  2,228,000  +  5.0  81.865,000  77,980,000
 64.895.000  tOS .0  126.1  Boo.  85  87  81
Potatoes.-----------     258,000  239 .000  +  7.9  23,220,000  16,730.000
 23,553,000  138.8  98.6  Bus.  76  62  84
Tobacco ------------      10,500  12,500   -16.7    13,758,000 16.023.000
46,223,000  85.9  29.8  Lbs.  79  69   83
Oats----a ---------     2,310,000  2,457,000  -  6.0  61 ,215,000  63,882,000
 84,750.000  95.8  72.2  Bos.  61  59  85
Barley --------  ----    741 .000  805,000   8.0    17,414,000  17,710,000
 21,288,000  98.3  81.6  Bus.  64  60  88
Rye -2-1-5---------      ,S000   226,000   - 4.9    1,828,000  2.260.000
 2,329.000  80.9  78.5  Bus.  ---  --------
Wisiter wheat.,---------- 24 .000  32 .000  25S.0     276 .000  464.000 
729 .000  59 .5  37.9  Boa.  ------- --- - -----
Spring wheat----------    86,000  72,000   +19.4    1 .247,000  1,152.000
 1,258,000 108.2  99.1  Boo.  -64  -70 - 84
Clover and timothy  -- .----- 1 502,000  2,003,000  -25.0 . .    ....----------------
 - ---  ---- Tonse ----  - ---- - -----
Alfalfa.------------     499,000  542,000  -  7.9     796,000  1,111,000
 725,000  71.8  110.1  Tons  58  84     85
Other tame hay---------2,732,000  2,949,000  - 7.4  2,623,000  3,685,000
 5,030,000  71.2  52.1  Tons  36  64    81
All tame hay ---- ------ 4,733,000  5.494.000  -13.9  3,421,000  4,796,000
 5,755,000  71.3  59 .4  Tons   ----  ------
Wild hay-- ----------    340,000  340,000 --------    306,000  374,000  248,000
 81.8  123,4  Tons  Sit  - 75.   83
Dry peas---- ----- ---    21,000  16,000   +16.7   ------  -- ---- - ---
-- - --- -------   --- - - - - -- -- - -- -- -
Dry beans -----------     7.000    5,000   +40.0      27,000   20,000   26,000
135.0  96.4  Bus.   -77 --75      84
Flax --5--------.---      S000     4,000   +25.0      48.000   40,000   92,000
120.0  52.2  Bus.    72    76    866
Canning peas----------   114,700  93,000   +23.3      61,360   54,670   81,790
111.8  75.0  Toss      -- ---- ----
Sugar beeta -25---------   .000   17,200   +45.3      187,000  -------,------
  ---- -  --  Tons    77     85    86
Apples--- ------- - -  --------------------          1 .036,000  1,938 .000
 1,661 .000  53.5  62.4  Boa.  43  67  64
Cherries ------------  -------------------              4,400   7,040   
5,640  62.5  75.3  Tona    55    88     86
Pasture -- - - -- - -- - - -- - - ------ - -- - - -- - -- - - -- I - -- -
- -- - -- - -4-8--- - -- - - -- - -8-- --   - -77 8   8 7


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