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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIII ([covers January 1934/December 1934])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIII, no. 7,   pp. [25]-28 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [25]


U1A   L  LNlJU U, u * "   -
WIS. LEG. REF. LIBRARY
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureaiu nf Agariciltural Economics
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & MARKETS
Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural Statistician
S. J. GILBERT, Assistant Agricultural Statistician
Vol. XIII, No. 7                 State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin      
                   July, 1934
WEATHER conditions in Wisconsin
during June were fairly favorable
in most counties. The extreme spring
drought lasted through May and the
first week of June. Since then rainfall
has been well above normal at most of
the stations in the state and the rain-
fall during the past month has been
shortest in the extreme southern coun-
ties and so the poorest conditions are
in that area. As much as 8 inches of
rain was reported at points in Wiscoll-
sin. Temperatures during the month
averaged well above normal at atll
points of the state though there was
less excessive heat in the latter part of
June than a year ago. In spite oIf the
relatively large moisture supply ill
many Wisconsin counties during June,
there is still a marked deficiency for
the year because of a lack of rasin or
snow during the first five months.
As a result of the June and July
rains whi ih have reached most cotuties
in good amounts, there is a substantial
improvement in grain crops, cash crops,
and corn. The ratins came too late for
the first crop of hay ann in some sec-
tions the grain was so far along that
it would not respond much to the im-
proved weather conditions. In most of
the state, however, crops are greatly
improved and prospects for second cut-
tings of alfalfa, corn, emergency hays
and the grains are much better than
they were earlier. There is enough
moisture in most counties now to ma-
ture the grain crops.
Crop Aerenge Changes
With the unusual conditions that
have prevailed for several years as a
result of drought and open winters, the
marked adjustment in crop acreage
continues. Hay, which normally occu-
pies more Wisconsin crop land than
any other single crop, has decreased
greatly. Clover and timothy is reduced
otie-fourth below last year's small acre-
age and the ar a ill this crop is only
about one-half of what it has been un-
der favorable conditions. I"ec" atse of
extensive winter killitng the acreage of
alfalfa has also decreased from a yeal
ago but there is a marked increase in
the acreage of emergency hay crops
such as soy beans, sudan grass, millet,
and fodder corn. These crops have
more than doubled as compared with
nearly two years ago. Declines are
shown by all of the grain crops except
spring wheat. Corn shows a 5 percent
increase in acreage as compared with a
year ago. In the cash crops increases
are general with the exception (If to-
bacco which shows a sharp drop froin a
year ago. The potato crop which far
exceeds in importance ally other cash
crop in the State shows an inlerca-se of
over 8 percent in area, dry peas nearly
18 percent, dry beans 401 percellnt, flx 25
percent, and sugar beets 45 percent.
The total area in crops showvs little
change from a year ago due to the fact
that crop fa lure hits been largely re-
placed by emergency forage plantings
and pastures have been broken ullp in
sonie placcs to make land :available for
emergency forage crops.
Wloeonsis July Crop lrroSpectS
Tame hay, which is the state's most
important crop, as now estimated will
make the smallest production since
1910.  Through   successive years of
drought and open wvinters the clover
and timothy haly acreage has been re-
duced to only about one-half of normal
and the yields of hay of this type as
well as most old meadows are exceed-
ingly light. Because of the marked
shortage  of the more common hay
crops, other hays such its sudan grass.
millet, and soy blans halves beenu widely
planted. While the Juiie and July rains
xvill help the pr-oduction of these emer-
gency hays, they call only in part off-
set the general hay shortage. The
alfalfa acreage is somiexwhat lower thrain
a year ago but still relatively large.
The first crop has been mostly a short
one. With more moisture second al-
falfa crop prospects are better in niany
counties.
The supply of grain for feed will tae
exceedingly low in Wisconsin this fall.
CROP SUMMARY OF WISCONSIN FOR JULY 1, 1934
Acreage
Percent in-
crease(+) or
decrease (-)
1933     of 1934 acreage
compared to
1933 average
2,228,000      + 1.0
238'000      + 8.4
12,600     -16.7
2,457,000      -  6.0
805 000      -8.0
226,000      -4.9
32,000     -25.0
72,000      +19 .4
2,003,000     -25.0
542,000     -7.9
404 ,000     +80.9
2,949,000      -7.4
340 000
18,000      +16.7
5 000      +40.0
4,000     +-25.0
93 ,000     +23.3
17,200     +±45.3
-    -   - - - - - - -
Production
July 1, 1934
forecast
79,526,000
21 930,000
13,020,000
53,130,000
15,932,000
1.6828000
288 '000
1 247 000
1 ,202 ,000
798,000
459 000
2,459,000
Z72 ,000
53 .300
45 000
57 350
176 ,000
1036.000
4 .400
1933
77 ,980,000
16 ,730 ,000
16,023,000
63,882,000
17 ,710 ,000
2 ,260 ,000
464 000
1,152 000
2,103,000
1,111 ,000
471 000
3,685 000
374 ,000
33.390
40,000
54 870
139,000
1 938.000
7.040
5-year
average
1927-31
64,891,000
23 ,53 ,000
46 ,223,000
84,750.000
21 288.000
2 ,329 .000
729 .000
1 .258 ,000
4,117 ,000
725,000
188,000
5,030 000
248,000
,    46.700
92 ,000
81 ,790
1,661 ,000
5 ,840
1934 as a
percent of
aerage
average
122 .1
93.1
23.2
62.7
74 .8
78.5
39 .5
99 .1
29.2
110.1
244 .1
48.9
l09 .7
114.1
48.9
i -62.4
75.3
102 .0
131 .1
81.3
83.2
90 .0
80.9
62 .1
108 .2
517 .2
71 .8
97.5
66.7
72.7
160 i
112.1
104.1
126.6
53.1
62 .S
Unit
Bus.
Bus.
Lbs.
Bus.
Bus.
Bus.
Bus.
Bus.
Ton s
Tons
Tons
To,,s
Tons
Bus.
Bus.
Tons.
Tons
Bus.
Tons
. - - -
Condition July 1,
Percent of Normal)
1934
85
82
80
57
60
44
51
62
31
44
--- i6-
33
46
85
75
48
74
43
52
42
1933
88
77
60
70
72
71
70
74
68
84
68
76
74
82
59
10-yr.
average
1922 -31
81
87
88
88
88
84
82
861
782
85
i77
81'
86
86
70
71       70
82       74
72       84
1 Nine-ycsr sverslte, 1823-l113t             il.Jgtt..yc,,r avcragr, 1824-11131.
IN THIS ISSUE
July Crop Report
July Dairy Report
Egg Production
Prices of Farm Products
Wages of Farm Labor
Crop
Corn .
Potatoes
Tobacco
Oats X,
Barley
Rye,
Winter wheat_
Spring wheat,
Clover and timothy
Alfalfa -
Other tame hay
All tame hay
Wild hay_
Dry peas
Dry beans
Flt   _
Canning peas
Sugar beets
Apples --      -
Cherries --    -
Pastsre
1934
(Preliminary)
I 3 .-00 0-
2 339 090
259 000
10 ,500
2,310.000
741.000
215.000
24 000
866000
50 2n 000
49 .000
731 000
2 732 000
340 000
21 .000
7 .000
5 ,000
114 700
25 000
1933
.1-11aht-yeatr average, 1924-1931l.
I Nine-year aeverage, 1923- I 931
70.1


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