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The Bugler
(1918)

School calendar,   pp. 33-38


Page 33

SCHOOL CALENDAR 
SEPTE MB ER 
17. School opens. 
18. Students consider seriously the advisability of taking books home. 
20. The student body spends the day at Door-Kewaunee County Fair grounds
judging 
cattle and otherwise applying knowledge gained in classes. 
24. More students enroll. 
26. Boys begin construction of bounding boards for bisketball, not without
some 
arguments, however. 
28. First social gathering is held. We learn to fox-trot. 
OCTOBER 
1. Senior class begins studying "October's Bright Blue Weather."
 Weatherman 
sends rain. 
2. Boys begin basketball practice. 
3. Seniors still continue study of "October's Bright Blue Weather."
More rain. 
4. Girls begin basketball practice. 
9. Frances and Flora get "soaked through." Question: XWhere is
the umbrella? 
12. Students have a "goodly" number present at the Red Cross dance.
17. Mr. Tufts suggests that the student body publish a School Annual. 
91. Progressive Society stirs,-rolls over, and rubs its eyes. Business begins.
24. Liberty Day. After having decided to purchase a Liberty Bond the students
are 
granted a half holiday. The time is spent in a beechnutting party. The Agricul-
ture class gathers a large number of weeds for study. 
26. Hobgoblins visit Training School. The secretary's record of the affair
reads thus: 
A Hallowe'en party was given by the members of the Delphian Society in the
Assembly Room, on October 26. An appropriate program was rendered by the
members of the society. The numbe:s were: 
Song, "Hallowe'en"-School. 
Talk, "Origin of Hallowe'en"-Louise Schmidt. 
Piano Solo, "La Grace"-Fyrn Empey. 
Reading, "Saved by a Ghost"-Hattie Stevens. 
Song, "Our Flag"-School. 
The room was decorated with orange and black paper, tiny witches, ghosts
and 
goblins, Jack o' Lanterns, that added much to the entire effect were placed
about the 
room. Ghosts and witches as well as fairies were present. A fortune teller
with for- 
tune favors was there, too. A dainty lunch was served at ten o'clock. That
a "spooky" 
feeling was present in the hearts of the guests is true-the ghosts were so
realistic. 
29. Weatherman sends us snow to insure a due appreciation on our part of
"October's 
Bright Blue Weather." Election of members of Annual Staff takes place.
30. First meeting of the Staff is held. 
NOVEMBER 
1-2. Students have two days of vacaticn-supposed vacation- work and plenty
of it 
is assigned so that no one need waste any time. 
5. Agriculture class visits the implement store for the purpose of studying
modern, 
improved farm machinery. 
9. Again we refer to the secretary's book for a history of the event: 
The informal gathering held in the Assembly Room today was without a doubt
one 
of the most educational social gatherings ever held in our school. A well-planned
picnic 
lunch was served at 6 p. m. to the following guests: Mr. L. A. Karel and
son Francis, 
State Club Leader T. L. Bewick, Inspector W. E,. Larson, Senator and Mrs.
M. W. 
Perry, Supt. Bernard Madden, Supt. F. J. Worachek, Principal and Mrs. F.
A. Maas, 
Principal and Mrs. R. J. McMahon, Rev. Jordheim, Mr. and Mrs. Moulton Goff,
Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Koss and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hoslett. Mr. Karel, after luncheon,
acted 
as toastmaster. Each of the gentlemen guests present was called upon to give
a five 
minute talk. Each had a joke as well as something of educational value to
give. The 
students then gave an impromptu program-illustrative of every-day life at
this institu- 
tion. The affair was unanimously conceded a most enjoyable one. 
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