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Annual report, 1939: St. Croix Co. Agricultural Agent
(1939)

Sheep,   pp. 9-10 PDF (801.0 KB)


Page 9


9.
     This office has strived to cooperate with the various clubs
and the Center groups from timo to timo. It is rather difficult
for us to give much constructive help because of our other duties
and because of our lack of aptitude in this work.
INSECT PEST CONTROL
     The grasshopper plague which was so evident in 1938 did
practically no damage in 1939.  Wo had a small infestation this year
and it was oncouraging to know that farmers are on the watch for
grasshoppers and reported them as soon as they showed up. Only
a srmll amount of poison was used this year in the county.
POULTRY IMPROVEWNUTT
     Recognizing the fact that thero is room for 150 to 250 lay-
ing hens on every farm in the county, we have givon considerable
attention to poultry flocks and their management. Much of the
work done on the poultry has boon done through individual contacts
discussing the facts with individual farmers. We have had an 0s-
pocially good season for chronic diseases in poultry.   Our flocks,
however, are going into the fall in very good shape and promise
to be a good source of revenue for the coming season.
COOPERATIVE I'AARKETIY-
     This office has always promoted the cooperative movements.
This past season we have had our usual contributions toward the
encouragement of cooperative marketing and also cooperative pure
chasing of farm materials. Successful farm cooperatives can and
do succood when properly managed. An oarnost and interested Board
of Directors is essential to the success of any Cooperative. This
interest must be carried on through the years if continued success
is to be had. I have always felt that a Cooperative organized as
a result of a definite need by farmers who are willing to give much
of their time in organizing has a better chance to succeed than one
which comes as a result of organizing merely to have another
Cooperative. When the going gets tough, those same farmers will
come back and battle for the Cooperative and they will see that
the Cooperative succeeds because they are Just selfish enough to
not want to see their previous efforts lost. Farmers in this county
and elsewhere can well afford to partake of the benefits of a sound
Cooperative.
     A sheep meeting last spring, at which time Prof. Lacey~of the
College of Agriculture pointed out sound management factors, was
instrumental in bringing to the attention of sheep men in the county
the fact that cooporativo marketing of wool was a paying proposition.


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