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Ben Yƻsuf, Anna / The art of millinery: a complete series of practical lessons for the artiste and the amateur
(1909)

Glossary of millinery and dry goods terms,   pp. 248-256 ff. PDF (1.1 MB)


Page 249

 
THE ART OF MILLINERY 
  finished hat or hood, also of felt. 
  wool and beaver. 
Bokbara.-A     diaphanous   silk  of 
  natural color in which a weave of 
  white taffeta silk is produced. 
Botany Yarn.-Yarn composed of a 
  fine grade of Australian wool and 
  used in the manufacture of worsted 
  dress goods. 
Bouillonnd.-Narrow shirrings of chif- 
  fon that edge wide ruffles or plait- 
  ings of the same or other materials. 
BoucIl.-Knotted and curled effects 
  raised upon the surface of the cloth 
  produced by the use of two-ply yarn 
  in which one thread is wound around 
  the other and partly drawn out so 
  as to produce a loop. Rarely used 
  in silk fabrics. 
Bourbon.-A machine-made lace of 
   both silk and cotton. Scroll-like 
   patterns, cable edged on regular 
   mesh. 
Bourette.-An    effect produced   by 
   introducing lumpy, knotted yarn 
   in the weaving. The yarn so intro- 
   duced is woven in at intervals, form- 
   ing patterns or creating an evenly 
   arranged rough surface. 
Box Plait.-A double fold or plait 
   formed by folding the cloth alter- 
   nately in opposite directions so as 
   to form a plait from each side. 
Brandenburg. A military ornament 
   of braid and loops with which a 
   jacket is fastened. Sometimes used 
   on hats. 
Bretonne.-Cheap narrow edging. 
Brides.-Slender threads connecting 
   different parts of pattern lace. 
Bride Lace.-Laces with pattern con- 
   nected   with   brides   (meaning 
   bridges.) Same as bone point lace. 
Brilliant.-Indicates a finish of great 
   luster. 
Brocade. Heavy-weight      silk with 
   raised figures of flowers, foliage, or 
   other, sometimes gold or silver 
   threads woven in. Any fabric with 
   a Jacquard effect. 
Brocatelle.-A damask, principal fig- 
   ures having raised surface. 
Broch.-An effect where the warp 
   design is raised in floats and ap- 
   pears as though embossed on the 
   surface of the fabric. 
Brod&--Embroidered effects either on 
   silks, woolens or cottons. 
Brussels Net.-Plain net made origin- 
   ally in Brussels, but now made in 
   all lace countries. 
 Brussels Pillow.-Fine pillow lace with 
   Fatterns joined together by little 
   ops on their edges. 
Brussels Point.-Shows opem pattern, 
  made in partly open and partly 
  closed stitch, giving appearance of 
  shading. 
Buckram.-Cotton cloth two or more 
  ply united and stiffened with Agglu- 
  tenates. 
Butcher's Linen.-A plain weave fab- 
  ric of linen used for dress purposes, 
  similar to crash in appearance but 
  lighter in weight and composed of 
  smoother yarns. 
Cabochon.-A round buckle or brooch. 
Cachepeigne.--Titerally "hide comb." 
  Any trimming on a hat that fulfils 
  this purpose, but more correctly the 
  trimming should be placed beneath 
  the back rim. 
Camel's Hair.-A loosely woven wool- 
  en fabric in which a very long fiber 
  is employed. It is composed of the 
  finest worsted. 
Canile.-A jointed effect with stripes 
  broken at intervals by knots or 
  small squares. 
Canneld.-A channel effect in weaving 
  giving lengthwise stripes in raised 
  or lowered effect on the goods in 
  small patterns. 
Canotier. Sailor style, cloth or hat. 
Canton,-A cheap chine straw braid. 
Capeline.-Hat with soft brim. 
Cape Net.-Stiff finished Nottingham 
  net. Sometimes called rice net. 
Capote.-Close hat toque or cap. 
Capuchon.-A hood for evening wear. 
Carreau.-A square check. 
Carrickmacross.-Tiny Irish cambric 
   drawn-work appliqud on net. 
Cartisane--Guipure or passementerie, 
   made on thin silk or gilt covered 
   strips of parchment. 
Cashmere.-A wool fabric twilled on 
  one side only, with soft finish. 
Challie.-An extremely light-weight 
   dress fabric, cotton or wool, woven 
   without twill, free from dressing. 
Chameleon.-A three-toned glaciE ef- 
  fect. 
Champagne.-Delicate golden ecru. 
Changeant--Changeable     effects in 
  color produced by crossing the 
  weaves. 
Changeant.-Changeable, Iridescent. 
Chantilly.-Pillow lace very similar to 
  blonde. Made in both silk and cot- 
  ton. 
Chapeau.-Sing.      Chapeaux,    plu. 
   (hat) (hats). 
Cheesecloth.-Thin muslin, bleached 
  or brown, free from sizing. 
Cheviot.-Twilled, nappy woolen clot h. 
Chic.-Pronounced     'shik."  Smuart. 
   Good style. 
240 


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