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Surrender of Italy, Germany and Japan, World War II
(1946)

Part I. Surrender of Italy,   pp. [1]-[36]


Page 9

Those of you who are in the Aegean or the Black
Sea, if you cannot make good your escape from the
Germans, who are now your enemies, do not let your
ships fall into their hands. As a last resort, scuttle
them or sabotage them, rather than let them fall
infto the hands of the Germans to be used against
Italy.
Ships intending to act in conformity with this
message may confirm their safe conduct by calling
"Malta V P T" or "Algiers F U G" or "Alexandria
S U H" on 500 kilocycles.6
"ithe war between Italy and the United
Nations is ended"
Order of the Day addressed by radio to Italian forces in the
Balkan and Aegean areas by the Allied Commander in the
Middle East, LIEUTENANT GENERAL SIR HENRY MAITLAND
WILSON.
Cairo. September 8, 1913.7
An armistice has been signed by your Government.
The war between Italy and the United Nations is
ended.
Based on the terms of the armistice, the following
are my immediate orders to all members of the Italian
armed forces in the Balkan area:
6 These preliminary instructions were expanded in the Cunningham-DeCourten Memorandum
of Agreement on Employment and Disposition of the Italian Fleet and Merchant Marine on Sep-
tember 23, and amended on November 17, 1943. Admiral R. DeCourten registered his objection
to the amendment of the original Memorandum in a statement issued November 17, 1943; the
amendment broadened controls by the Allies; on November 6, 1945, the State Department released
a commentary regarding the execution of the Cunningham-DeCourten Memorandum. Depart-
ment of State Bulletin, November 11, 1945.
7 New York Times. September 9, 1943


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