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Letter from the Secretary of the Navy, transmitting, in compliance with resolution of January 27, report of Lieutenant Taunt of a journey on the river Congo
(1887)

Letter from the Secretary of the Navy, transmitting, in compliance with resolution of January 27, report of Lieutenant Taunt of a journey on the river Congo,   pp. [1]-42 ff.


Page 38

JOURNEY ON THE RIVER CONGO.
The entire expenses of Weissman's expedition were borne by the King
of the Belgians. It, however, has no connection with the Congo State,
being entirely distinct.
Another exploring expedition was sent out by the Geographical So.
ciety of Berlin, and is commanded by Lieutenant Kund, of the German
army. This party reached Stanley Pool, and were there obliged to stop
on account of having no means for the transportation of their goods, &c.,
on the Upper Congo.
Lieutenant Kund intends to explore some of the larger affluents of
the Congo, and has, I believe, made arrangements for placing a steamer
on the Upper River.
In July, 1885, Kund, with some eighty Loangos, started across the coun.
try from Stanley Pool to the valley of the Kassai. A rumor was in
circulation in October, 1885, that the expedition had met hostile people,
and ten Loangos were reported killed.
The third expedition has been sent out by the Austrian Geographical
Society, under the command-of Prof. Franz Linz. The object of this
expedition is to discover the outlet of the Welle, and, with this end in
view, they hope to be able to explore the Oubangi River. In October,
1885, I met two white men, the assistants of Professor Linz, when they
were en route to Stanley Pool. They had no people with them, and had
made no arrangement for means of navigating the Upper River, hoping
to hire native canoes. This they will find impossible, and the steamers
on the Upper River at present have all they can do to keep up their
own necessary work.
Rev. George Grenfell, of the English Baptist Mission, has been in-
defatigable in his explorations of the valley of the Congo. In his lit.
tle steamer, the Peace, he has been the pioneer on most of the impor-
tant affluents, and has contributed much valuable geographical infor.
mation to the scientific world.
THE ARABS.
When Stanley established the Stanley Falls Station, in 1883, he met
Arab slavers in the vicinity of Stanley Falls, where they had already
commenced their work of destruction.
After the establishment of the station, the Arabs withdrew to Ny-
angwe. In May, and again in July, 1884, small paities of Arabs came
down to the seventh cataract, and requested permission to go down the
river, but were refused by the chief-of-station.
Everything was quiet until October, 1884, when a caravan of three
hundred men came down from Nyangwe, in command of Moniomoui, the
son of Tippoo Tib. This chief was most insolent, threatened to force a
passage, but finally settled on one of the islands above the seventh cat-
aract. In November, 1884, another body of Arabs, three hundred strong,
came down and settled on the opposite bank of the river. In Decem-
ber, 1884, Tippoo Tib arrived at the seventh cataract with seven hun-
dred men, and settled on the island above the seventh cataract. There
were now between twelve and thirteen hundred Arabs at this place, all
under the powerful chief, Tippoo Tib.
In an interview between the chief of Stanley Falls Station and Tip-
poo Tib, the latter claimed that he represented the Sultan of Zanzibar,
that all the country on the Congo belonged to the Sultan; and he in-
formed the white men that he intended sending seven hundred men
down the river to buy ivory; if the white men attempted to interfere
he would exterminate them, but if they did not interfere the station


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