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Letter from the Secretary of the Navy, transmitting, in compliance with resolution of January 27, report of Lieutenant Taunt of a journey on the river Congo
(1887)

Letter from the Secretary of the Navy, transmitting, in compliance with resolution of January 27, report of Lieutenant Taunt of a journey on the river Congo,   pp. [1]-42 ff.


Page 7

JOURNEY ON THE RIVER CONGO.
night was coming on, it was decided not to attack the village until the
early morning.
About 2 a. m. the next day, Deane's camp was attacked by a large
body of savages, during a heavy tornado, the State losing seven killed
and six wounded, among the latter being Mr. Deane, who had received
two dangerous spear wounds. The killed were buried the next day on
an island some distance from the camp, and the Royal started for Stan-
ley Falls to obtain proper comforts for the wounded. This fight occurred
in the same channel where the Henry Reed had been so savagely at-
tacked on the afternoon of the 13th.
When passing the mouth of the Arroowimi River with the wounded,
fifteen war-canoes had tried to surround the Royal about midday, but
drew off after several natives had been killed and two canoes swamped.
We remained at anchor the night of the 15th, in company with the
Royal. We were not troubled until about 3 a. m. the 16th, when two
canoes were detected trying to steal upon us. A warning from the
lookout soon drove them off.
At daylight, we discovered eight large war-canoes, with from thirty to
forty men in each, lying alongside an islamd opposite to us. It was
necessary to fill up with wood. I therefore sent my men on shore, with
a guard from the Royal. The people had been cutting about an hour
when the sentries discovered some natives lurking in the bushes. They
were driven off with a few shots, and gave us no further trouble. We
got underway about midday, and in company with the Royal started
for Stanley Falls. The war-canoes followed us with horns blowing, but
"we soon distanced them, and in two hours they had given up the chase.
From the Arroowimi to StanleyFalls the natives were livingin canoes;
the villages on both banks had been burned by the Arabs in the spring,
and in only a few instances had the people commenced rebuilding. We
had no more trouble with the natives, but were inconvenienced consid-
erably by not being able to buy food for the men.
We arrived at Stanley Falls Station on the afternoon of August 20,
having made the trip from Stanley Pool to Stanley Falls, a distance of
1,000 miles, in forty-eight days, including stoppages at the different
stations below Bangala. Iwas received very kindly by the two Swedish
lieutenants in charge of the station, and offered every assistance.
I found Mr. Deane in a very low state, and as there were no medical
comforts to be had at the Falls, I finally persuaded him to accompany
me down as far as the Equator Station, where he would be able to ob-
tain medical attention and nourishing food. My own stock of wine, &c.,
I turned over to him, his own being exhausted.
While at Stanley Falls, I had interviews with Tippoo Tib's head men
(he was at Nyangwe), took a trip above the seventh cataract, and vis-
ited the native villages in the vicinity of the Falls.
On the morning of August 25, we moved Deane on board, and made
preparations for the return trip to Stanley Pool. Above Bangala, we
had kept to the north bank, going up; it was determined to return by
the south bank.
In company with the Royal, we left Stanley Falls Station at 10 a. m.,
August 25, and arrived at Bangala on the 1st of September, eight days
from Stanley Falls.
On the south bank we found the natives friendly, except opposite the
mouth of the Arroowimi River, where we were watched by a number of
Canoes until about 2 a. m., when a severe tornado drove them to their
villages. On August 30, our small boat was swamped and lost while


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