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Military government weekly information bulletin
No. 34 (March 1946)

Highlights of policy,   pp. [5]-12 PDF (4.8 MB)


Page 6

cooperation of -all peoples and through
the progressive establishment of a real
international society.
Technical procedures and diplomatic
arrangements will not suffice. There can
be no well-balanced and enduring nation
without a common consent in the
essential rules of social living, without
a general standard of. behavior before
-the claims of conscience without the
adherence of all citizens to identical con-
cepts of good and of evil; there is no
domestic law  which in defining and
punishing  criminal violations is ' not
founded on criteria of a moral order
wAich are accepted by all - in a word,
without a commnon morality. There can
be no society-"of nations tomorrow
without an international morality, without
a certain community of spiritual civili-
zation, without an identical hierarchy of
values. International law will be called
upon to recognize and guarantee the
"punishment of the gravest violations of
the universally accepted moral laws. This
morality and this international criminal
law, indispensable for the final establish-
ment of peaceful cooperation and of
progress on lasting foundations, are in-
conceivable to us today, after the
experience of past centuries and more
especially of these last years, after the
incredible and awesome sacrifices and
the sufferings of men of all races and of
all nationalities, as built on the respect
of the human person by every human per-
son whosoever he may be, as well as on
*the limitation of the sovereignty of states.
But in order that we may have the
hope of founding an international society
through the free cooperation . of all
peoples on this morality and on this
international law, it is necessary that
after having premeditated, prepared and
launched a war of aggression which has
caused the death of millions of men
and the ruin of a great number of nations,
after having thereupon piled up the most
odious crimes in the course of the war
years, nazi Germany shall be declared
guilty and her rulers and those chiefly
responsible punished as such. Without
this sentence and without this punishment
the nations would have no faith in justice.
'When you have declared that crime is
always crime, whether committed by a
national entity against other nations or
by one individual against another, you
will thereby have .affirmed that there is
only one morality, which applies to inter-
national relations as well as to individual
relationships, and.- that on this morality
are built prescriptions of law recognized
by the international community; you will
then-have truly begun to establish an
international justice.
AWAKEN GERMAN CONSCIENCE
This work of justice is equally in-
*dispensable for the future of the Ger-
man people. These people have been for
many years intoxicated by nazism; cer-
tain of their eternal and deep-seated aspi-
*rations, under this regime. They have
found a monstrous expression, their
entire responsibility is involved, not only
by their general acceptance but by the
effective partizipation of a great number
of them in the crimes committed. Their
re-education is indispensable. This repre-
sents a difficult enterprise and one of
long duration. The efforts which the free
peoples will have to make in order to
reintegrate Germany in the international
community cannot succeed in the end if
this re-education is not carried out effec-
tively. The initial condemnation 'of nazi
Germany by your High Tribunal will
be a first lesson for these people. It will
constitute the best starting point for the
work of revising their values and of their
re-education during the coming years.
CRIME AGAINST INDIVIDUAL DIGNITY
Judge Jackson has given you the
details of the various phases and aspects
of the national-socialist plot, its playining
and its development, from the first days
of Hitler's and his companion's   on-
spiracy  and  their  subsequent  rise
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