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Germany (Territory under Allied occupation, 1945-1955 : U.S. Zone). Office of Military Government. Civil Administration Division. / Population changes, 1947 : U.S. Zone Germany
(1948)

Section VI: assimilation of refugees,   pp. 33-36 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 34


_____ _____POPULATION CHANGES 1947
shopkeepers depends mostly on the issuance of new licenses for these occupa-
tions, obstructed in many instances by existing German regulations. Moreover,
fear of new competition  tends to limit the number of licenses issued   To
eliminate these difficulties, Bavaria is passing an ordinance compelling
all
Kreise to issue licenses to expellees and normal residents on a pro-rated
basis
according to population. Similar difficulties exist in the assimilation of
professional persons, such as physicians and lawyers. Admissions to these
pro-
fessions are based on a 'numerus clausus" system and difficulties arise
from
the fact that the examinations of foreign countries are not always valid
within
Germany. The most difficult problem is the settlement of independent farmers.
Although expellees have special priority in the land reform procedure, there
is little chance for the majority of the immigrant farmers to be settled
on
their own farms within Germany. the number of farms which can be newly estab-
lished by the land reform being very small. Many of the expellee farmers
must
either change their occupations, with consequent social resentment as a result
of decreased income and lower social position, or wait for an opportunity
to
emigrate. Insofar as it is possible to judge, the assimilation of wage and
salary earners has made the greatest progress, as these groups consist of
those
of highest adaptability. Among these, manual workers have made more progress
toward assimilation than clerical workers.
In the earlier discussion of internal migration, the movement from
the country to the city was partly attributed to the economic assimilation
of
refugees. This contention is directly supported by data on employment of
wage
and salary earners in Bavaria, as shown in the following table of labor market
statistics on refugees and natives.
TABLE XXIII
EMPLOYMENT IN BAVARIA
RBIUGDI AND NATIVE WAGE AND SALARY ZARNERS
March-December 1947
Month      Total     As Percent   Refugees   As Percent     Natives1!  As
Percept
(1947)                of Base                 of Base                   of
Base
Period*                 Period*                   Period'
March    2,180,614     100.00     417,080      100.00     1,763,534     
100.00
April    2,209,685     101.33     433.696      103.98     1,775,989     
100.71
May      2,239,546     102.70     454,630      109.00     1,784,916     
101.21
June     2,267,491     103.98     471,558      113.06     1,795,933     
101.84
July     2,282,896     104.69     485,385      116.38     1,797,511     
101.93
Aug.     2,299.126     105.43     492,662      118.12     1,806,464     
102.43
Sept.    2,325,169     106.63     509,103      122.06     1,816,066     
102.98
Oct.     2,340,183     107.32     516,521      123.84     1,823,662     
103.41
Nov.     2,350,624     107.80     521,957      185.15     1,828,667     
103.69
Dec.     2,368,421     108.61     529,465      126.95     1,838,956     
104.28
I March taken as 100.
JIncluding resident foreigners
The conclusions whicn can be drawn from this table are that from
March 1947 to the end of the year the percent increase of employed refugees
was more than six times as great as the percent increase of employed natives,
and that sixty percent of the total increase of 188,000 in employed wage
and
salary earners in Bavaria were composed of newly employed refugees.
34
CIVIL A&nMlNlwTrTinu nlIvIcin
_ _


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