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Miles, Nelson Appleton, 1839-1925 / Personal recollections and observations of General Nelson A. Miles embracing a brief view of the Civil War, or, From New England to the Golden Gate: and the story of his Indian campaigns, with comments on the exploration, development and progress of our great western empire
(1896)

Chapter XXXVIII. The Arizona campaign. II,   pp. 494-505 PDF (4.7 MB)


Page 494


PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF
                         CHAPTER XXXVIII.
                       THE ARIZONA CAMPAIGN. II.
THE QUESTION OF REMOVING THE INDIANS FROM ARIZONA -CONSULTATIONS WITH AGENTS
-CAPTAIN
   PIERCE--COLONEL WADE-DISCHARGE OF THE APACIIE SCOUTS-VISIT TO FORT APACHE
       -THIE APPEARANCE OF THE AGENCY INDIANS-" TISWIN "-SENDING
A DELE-
           GATION TO WVASIIINGTON - THE RESULT - CORRESPONDENCE WITH WAR
               DEPARTMENT-FORT MARION DECIDED UPON AS PLACE OF
                  CONFINEMENT -PREPARATIONS AT FORT APACHE
                     -USIN G THE TELEGRAPH BETWEEN WIL-
                         COX AND FORT APACHE-" A
                             CHIP OF THE OLD
                        BLOCK."
HILE preparations and movements were in progress which in
  time were to subjugate the Indians in active hostility, great
  care was taken to prevent the other Indians at the agencies
  from  affording them  any assistance in men, munitions or
  provisions. Soon after I assumed command of that depart-
  ment in April, 1886, I became convinced that there could he
           no lasting peace or permanent settlement of the chronic con-
dition of warfare that had for many years afflicted the people of the
territory now  comprised in Arizona, New  Mexico and the bordering
Mexican States, until the Chiricahuas and Warm Spring Indians had
been removed from that mountainous region. The trails they had
made during past years showed that their raids had been froul the
agencies through the settlements south to old Mexico, and then back again
to the same beginning. Every few years a new generation of their boys
and young men had grown to manhood and become full fledged warriors
and their only hope of achieving distinction according to the traditions,
practice and influence of their fathers, was in committing acts of cruelty
and devastation.  All they knew of their own history appeared to be
confined to this field. It was taught them from their earliest infancy and
practiced until their old age.
   Early in the month of May, I went as far north as Fort Thomas,
Arizona, and there met by appointment Captain F. E. Pierce, who had
charge of the San Carlos agency. This officer has had a most remarkable
494


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