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Jensen, Merrill; Kaminski, John P.; Saladino, Gaspare J. (ed.) / Ratification of the Constitution by the states: Pennsylvania
(1976)

A. Responses to ratification and to The Dissent of the Minority,   pp. 646-669


Page 647

A. RESPONSES TO RATIFICATION/20 DEC.
The meeting took into consideration the report made to the people
of this county by their deputies to the state Convention. Whereupon,
Resolved unanimously: First, That we highly approve of the con-
duct of our deputies in assenting to and ratifying the Constitution of
the United States, as proposed by the late Federal Convention.
Second, That the chairman be requested to return our hearty thanks
to the said deputies for the patriotism, public spirit, and faithful
discharge of their duty, as representatives of this county.
Third, That their report, together with these resolutions, be trans-
mitted by the chairman to Philadelphia for publication.
Signed, by order of the meeting, Alexander Patterson,2 Chairman.
Attest. James Pettigrew, Secretary.
Friends and Fellow Citizens of Northampton County.
The representatives of this county in the late Convention of this
state think it their duty, as servants of the public, to lay before you,
their constituents, the result of their deliberations upon the new
Constitution for the United States submitted to their consideration
by a resolve of the legislature for calling a state convention.
The debates at large, we have reason to expect, will be published,
wherein those whose inclination may lead them to it will find a
detail of all the arguments made use of either for or against the adop-
tion of the Constitution. Our intention, therefore, is not to enter
fully into an investigation of the component parts of it, but only to
inform our constituents that it has been carefully examined in
all its parts; that every objection that could be offered to it has been
heard and attended to; and that upon mature deliberation, two-thirds
of the whole number of deputies from the city and counties in this
state have, in the name and by the authority of the people of this
state, fully ratified it upon the most clear conviction.
1st. That the state of America required a concentration and union
of the powers of government for all general purposes of the United
States.
2dly. That the Constitution proposed by the late Convention of
the United States, held at Philadelphia, was the best form that could
be devised and agreed upon.
3dly. That such a Constitution will enable the representatives of
the different states in the Union to restore the commerce of all the
states in general, and this in particular, to its former prosperity.
4thly. That by a diminution of taxes upon real estates, agriculture
may be encouraged and the prices of lands, which have of late greatly
declined, will be increased to their former value.
5thly. That by imposing duties on foreign luxuries, not only arts
and manufactures will be encouraged in our own country, but the
647


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