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Kaminski, John P.; Saladino, Gaspare J.; Moore, Timothy D. (Historian); Lannér-Cusin, Johanna E.; Schoenleber, Charles H.; Reid, Jonathan M.; Flamingo, Margaret R.; Fields, David P. (ed.) / Ratification of the Constitution by the states: Maryland (1)
11 (2015)

I. The debate over the Constitution in Maryland, 17 September-30 November 1787,   pp. 3-67


Page 10

I. DEBATE OVER CONSTITUTION
newspapers printed a brief announcement informing their readers thatJames
McHenry and Philip Rogers, "well known friends to the new Federal Constitu-
tion," were candidates for representatives (Mfm:Md. 15). The onslaught against
Chase and his fellow Antifederalist David McMechen was ineffectual since both
men were easily elected. Chase received 612 and McMechen 593 votes, while
McHenry and Rogers received 206 and 168 votes, respectively. In all, 830 voters
took part in the election (Maryland journal, 5 October [Mfm:Md. 16]). Mc-
Mechen's election was predictable since he had represented Baltimore Town
since 1779. Neither McMechen nor Chase was reelected in 1788 or 1789.
Maryland Journal, 28 September 17871
The following is the Conclusion of the SPEECH of SAMUEL CHASE,
Esq; delivered, this Day, at the Court-House, before a numerous and
respectable Body of Citizens.
(Published by Request of many Electors of Baltimore-Town.)
The Constitution proposed by the late Convention, for the United
States, will alter, and, in some Instances, abolish our Bill of Rights and
Form of Government.
The Legislature of this State have no Right to alter our Form of
Government, but in the Mode prescribed by the Constitution.2
The only Question for the General Assembly to determine is this,
whether they will recommend to the People to elect Delegates to meet
in CONVENTION, to consider and decide on the Plan proposed.
I have always maintained the Union, and the Increase of Powers in
Congress. I think the Federal Government must be greatly altered. I
have not formed my Opinion, whether the Plan proposed ought to be
accepted, as it stands, without any Amendment or Alteration.-The
Subject is very momentous, and involves the greatest Consequences.
If elected, I will vote for, and use my Endeavours to procure a Rec-
ommendation by the Legislature, to call a Convention, as soon as it
can conveniently be done, unless otherways directed by this Town.
September 26, 1787.
Having been informed, that my Engagement, of Yesterday, to the
Meeting, at the Court House, "to vote for, and use my Endeavours to
procure a Recommendation, by the Legislature, to call a Convention,
as soon as it can conveniently be done," is not understood; from a Desire,
if possible, to remove all Misunderstanding, I take the Liberty to de-
clare, that by the above Promise I meant to engage, and therefore do
promise, if elected, that I will use my Endeavours to procure, at the
next Session of Assembly, and as soon in the Session as the necessary
Business of the State will permit, a Recommendation by the General
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