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Hazard, H. W. (ed.) / Volume III: The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries
(1975)

VI: The Catalans in Greece, 1311-1380,   pp. 167-224 PDF (10.1 MB)


Page 224

 224 A HISTORY OF THE CRUSADES III 
Peter IV some forty years before, was most anxious to acquire. St. George
was patron of England, however, as well as of Catalonia, and Bertranet for
a time apparently contemplated the sale of the relic to king Richard II of
England. 202 Bertranet clearly did not regard himself as holding Livadia
by warrant of the king of Aragon, nor is there any evidence that the Catalans
ever regained Thebes. In any event Thebes and Livadia became Florentine possessions,
and Nerio Acciajuoli left them to his son Antonio I in 1394. Since Nerio
also made a bequest to Bertranet ("Baltrineto di Salai"), the connection
between the latter and the Acciajuoli is obvious. Bertranet may well have
been in Nerio's employ. 203 By the beginning of the year 1394, however, the
Turks were overrunning central Greece. They occupied Livadia. Obviously the
invasion of the Navarrese Company under John de Urtubia had meant for the
Catalans the permanent loss of ancient Boeotia and of Locris, and when in
1379 Peter IV of Aragon began the last decade of Catalan rule in continental
Greece, he possessed little more than the capitals of the two duchies, now
the city of Athens itself and Neopatras, together with some of their dependencies,
and the so-called county of Salona. 
 202. Dipl., doc. DCXXXVIII, p. 667. Before December 1399 the head of St.
George would pass into the possession of Alioto de Caupena, Catalan lord
of Aegina, who seems to have received it from Bertranet (Dipl., docs. DCLIII—DCLV,
DCLXIX, DCXCVIII). 
 203. For Nerio's will, see J. A. C. Buchon, Nouvelles recherches historiques,
II (Paris, 
1845), 257, 260, and Lampros, Eggrapha, part III, doc. 4, pp. 149, 152, and
cf. Setton, Catalan Domination, pp. 147, 197. 


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