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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1892
61st ([1892])

Reports of superintendents of schools,   pp. 647-708 PDF (30.2 MB)


Page 662

662        REPORTS OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF SCHOOLS. 
defect in the sanitary condition that I have been able to discover so far
is in the 
water supply, which is entirely inadequate to the needs of the school, and,
on ac- 
count of the present system, is impure by the time it reaches the buildings.
The Indians of this reservation are bitterly opposed to this school, owing
prin- 
cipally to the sickness and death of their children. Enrolling pupils will
be the 
difficult work of the year. This was the case last year, as the records show
the 
average attendance for the year to be only 69-R. The capacity of the school
was over 200. 
In overcoming this opposition it is my aim to remove every reasonable objec-
tion of the Indians. So far I have met with nothing but discouragement. Fill-
ing this school will be hard, tedious work, but I believe it can be accomplished
in time without the use of military force. 
Very respectfully, 
GEORGE P. GREGORY, 
Superintendent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
REPORT OF SCHOOL AT FORT'LAPWAI, IDAHO. 
FORT LAPWAI, IDAHO, Auqust 26, 1892. 
SIR: In compliance with circular instructions I have the honor to forward
here- 
with my second annual reportof the Fort Lapwai Indian industrial school.
Since my last report the school has made considerable advancement in all
branches, and I am well pleased with the progress made, althoVh I expect
to 
improve upon this another year. 
The pupils seem content and happy, many of them remaining during the vaca-
tion months. Such a thing has never before been known here, as pupils volun-
teering to stay at the school in the summer when their schoolmates were start-
ing for their homes. We have had from 10 to 15 through the vacation, and
some- 
times more. 
School.-School opened September 1 with 35 pupils, and others soon came in,
so 
that by November 1 the attendance was 148. 
The progress of schoolroom work was somewhat hindered by changes in the 
corps of teachers at the beginning of the term. The school was without a
prin- 
cipal teacher for nearly three months, and the position of primary teacher
was 
temporarily filled by advanced Indian pupils for two months. Since January
1. 
there has been no interruption in this department, and the children have
made 
rapid progress in their studies. 
Each teacher had been faithful and untiring in her efforts to advance the
pu- 
pils in her charge, and all have succeeded admirably, as has been shown at
the 
social gatherings given each month, where each teacher shows the work of
her 
own pupils. 
Two singing clubs, one of Indian employes and larger pupils, and one of young
boys were organized and instructed by the principal teacher with the assistance
of an organist; they practiced twice each week and furnished some excellent
music for our entertainment and social gatherings. 
While the general condition of the school has been greatly improved during
the last year there is still room for much improvement. 
Band.-The brass band under the leadership of Silas Whitman (an Indian gradu-
ate of Chemawa, Oregon) has been a source of great pleasure to the pupils
and a 
benefit to the school in keeping them content and happy. It is also a means
of 
attracting children to the schools who have never before taken interest in
schools or education. 
Fourth of July.-The entire school was invited to spend the 4th of July in
Lewis- 
ton, Idaho, and to assist in the exercises of the day, while the band furnished
the 
music for the occasion. The band, followed by the school boys in uniform
march- 
ing, and the girls riding, and carrying banners of the different States of
the 
Union, made a display of which I was very proud. They received compliments
and praise on all sides and merited the good will and respect of the public,
by 
their gentlemanly and lady-like conduct. Dinner and supper were given them
by the citizens of Lewiston and most of the prizes for the "sports for
boys" in 
the afternoon were awarded to the light-footed little red boys. 
I think many of the people of the surrounding country were astonished to
find 


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