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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1892
61st ([1892])

Reports of superintendents of schools,   pp. 647-708 PDF (30.2 MB)


Page 661

REPORTS OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF SCHOOLS. 
661 
We have this year under cultivation about 50 acres of ground, and expect
to 
have 100 acres ready for cultivation by next spring. 
Water supply.-There is in place an extensive waterworks plant, including
mains, large and small pipes, and a reservoir. After we get the engine, boiler,
and pump, which have been estimated for, we will not only have a good system
of waterworks, with good fire protection, but will also have power for a
steam 
laundry, or for other purposes for which power may be needed. 
Taking into consideration all these things, together with the fact that this
is 
the nearest training school to the large number of Indians in Colorado, New
Mexico. and Arizona. I see no reason why Fort Lewis should not soon become
one of the largest and most successful schools in the service. 
Very respectfully, 
Louis MORGAN, 
Superintendent and Special Disbursing Agent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
REPORT OF SCHOOL AT FORT HALL, IDAHO. 
FORT HALL INDIAN INDUSTRIAl SCHOOL, 
Blackfoot, Idaho, September 27, 1892. 
SIR: In compliance with instructions, I have the honor to submit the following
annual report: 
Having taken charge of this school August 5, 1892, and finding only 13 pupils
in attendance, all except that number having been dismissed the latter part
of 
June, this report will of necessity deal with the conditions as I found them
rather 
than the work done last year. 
Location.-This school is delightfully located in a valley among the foothills
of 
the Rocky Mountains, 10 miles southeast of Blackl'oot, Bingham County, Idaho,
the nearest railroad point. Here is an abundance of tine agricultural and
graz- 
ing land for the use of a large school, and being sheltered by the hills
and well 
watered, it is unusually well adapted to stock-raising. 
Buildings.-The buildings, 24 in number, are nicely arranged around a rectan-
gular-shaped campus. By using for dormitory for small girls the building
erected last year and intended to be used for shops, the school will have
a ca- 
pacity of 2.50 pupils, 100 girls and 150 boys. Five of the buildings are
new and 
in first-class condition. The large girls' quarters and large boys' quarters
both 
need considerable repairing. The dining room and kitchen are old and in very
bad condition, and should be replaced by a new building. The hospital is
incon- 
venient; rooms are badly arranged. Employes' quarters are unusually commo-
dious and exceptionally well furnished. 
Farm.-The farm consists of 2,000 acres, under fence, of which 65 acres were
under cultivation the past year, 25 acres each to wheat and oats and 15 acres
to 
potatoes and other vegetables. The yield is estimated as follows: 
Wheat-------------bushels- 400 Hay------------------tons 200 
Oats-------------------do    500 Cabbage   -----      heads 640 
Corn------------------do--- 30 Onions-------------bushels 150 
Potatoes--------------do    850 Beans------------------do-    12 
Turnips---------------do_-- 150 Other vegetables ------.do-- 432 
There is water to irrigate 250 acres of land. It is my plan to cultivate
this 
year a much larger tract than last year, sufficient to raise grain and alfalfa
for 
the stock, wheat enough to bread the school, vegetables, etc. 
The major portion of the farm is used for pasture for a herd of 160 head
of 
cattle. This is ample pasture for a much larger herd.  On account of its
natural advantages stock-raising should be made a prominent feature of the
work 
of this school. 
Industrial work.-In the industrial department a harnessmaker, blacksmith,
and carpenter are employed. I am not able to give a report of the work done
in 
these shops the past year. With better equipment this work will be both excel-
lent training for the pupils and a source of profit to the school. 
Health.-Although remarkably well located, with pure air, good drainage, and
other natural advantages, the health of the pupils has been very bad. There
has been a great deal of sickness and a large number of deaths. The only
serious 
A 


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