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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1892
61st ([1892])

Reports of superintendents of schools,   pp. 647-708 PDF (30.2 MB)


Page 654

654        REPORTS OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF SCHOOLS. 
REPORT OF SCHOOL AT PH(ENIX, ARIZ. 
PHCENIX INDIAN SCHOOL, 
Phoenix, Ariz., September 10, 1892. 
Sip: I have the honor to submit herewith my annual report of this school
for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892. 
The school was opened for the reception of pupils on the 3d of September
last 
in a 2-story brick structure situated in the west end of Phoenix, and leased
for 
the use of the school until buildings could be erected on the school site
situated 
3 miles north of the city. The house was not well adapted to the requirements
of the school, but the prevailing conditions in many respects were highly
favor- 
able and the school prospered from the outset. 
Attendance.--Duringu the first day of the term 31 boys were enrolled. On
the 
following Monday, the 6th. 10 additional boys were received. A few days later
another boy was admitted, making 42 in all, and the maximum number that 
could be fairly accommodated in the building. Owing to the arrangement of
the house pupils of both sexes could not be properly cared for. Hence boys
only 
were received. 
Six of the boys had attended school for several years and made considerable
advancement in certain of the elementary English bi-anches. They were quite
intelligent, and gentlemanly in their bearing and conduct. During the first
quarter 5 of them were appointed assistants in the school. Throughout the
year they have been faithful and helpful workevs. Four of the pupils had
at- 
tended the Pima Agency boarding school for a few months and made a mere 
beginning in their course of education and training. The remainder, 32, were
raw recruits that could neither speak nor understand English. 
With a single exception all were remarkably well formed and healthy. The
majority were large boys or full-grown young men. They were Well-disposed
and eager to learn and proved to be willing, handy workers, and apt students.
Industrial work.-For nine months, until girls were admitted to the school,
in 
addition to the work usually done by boys in an Indian training school, they
rendered all the assistance required in conducting the domestic affairs of
the 
establishment. Under the direction of the several employes they kept the
house clean and neat, set and cleaVed the tables in the dining room, washed
the 
dishes and cooking utensils, made bread and pies, and cooked'meats, vegetables,
and other sorts of food. They washed and ironed their own clothing and the
sheets, pillow slips, table linen, and towels belonging to the school. They
dis- 
played surprising aptitude for these lines of domestic work. 
School work.-In the school room ihey were attentive and diligent, and under
the tuition of their excellent teacher, Mr. Hugh Patton, a Pima Indian, made
rapid progress in their studies. As a rule, in all the departments of the
school 
they rendered prompt and willing obedience to those exercising authority
over 
them. 
While the school remained in town they attended the Presbyterian Sabbath
School and church services. In the Sabbath school they were divided into
classes, taught by prominent members of the church, and in other respects
treated on an equal footing with the white pupils of the school. 
Sunday observances. -Each Sabbath afternoon we hd exercises in the school
room, consisting of singing, Scriptural recitations by the pupils and addresses
bv visitors. Usually the room was crowded by citizens and strangers. Fre-
quently Indians from the reservation were highly interested spectators. 
The large pupils attended quite a number of public meetings held in the city,
visited the constitutional convention several times and availed themselves
of 
other favorable opportunities for improvement. 
Under all circumstances their deportment was admirable. No complaints 
were ever alleged against them. I never heard of any unfavorable criticisms
in 
regard to them. On all hands their manly bearing, correct deportment, and
rapid improvement were recognized in terms of praise. 
During the two months that have elapsed since the school was transferred
to 
its present admirable quarters it has been improved decidedly. Its tone has
been elevated, its efficiency increased. We have have had Sabbath school
each 
Sabbath morning and Preaching each Sabbath afternoon. The ministers of 
Phoenix and its vicinity have, in accordance with a schehule of appointments,
preached at the school. These church services have been attended by citizens
of Phonix and of the neighb'orhood in which the school is situated. 
Persistent and  ystematic efforts have been made from the outset to secure
the 
hearty coeperation of all worthy people, including Indians, in this section
of 


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