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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1892
61st ([1892])

Reports of superintendents of schools,   pp. 647-708 PDF (30.2 MB)


Page 653

REPORTS OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF SCHOOLS.                 653 
Industrial work.-The girls show considerable efficiency in domestic work.
Each 
girl, many only 6 and 7 years old, made herself two dresses, two skirts,
and two 
suits of underclothes, doing all the sewing of seams, hemming, and buttonholes
by hand. They also do good darning and mending, and the larger ones will
soon 
be able to cut garments. as several have made dresses for themselves during
va- 
cation unassisted. Much pains has been taken to teach all forms of politeness
and 
good table manners, and these are noticed by all visitors. 
The boys have kept a plentiful supply of good seasoned wood ahead through-
out the year. The School farm, of 30 acres, was mostly planted in rye, wheat,
and oats, since a crop of these is of more value, in furnishing forage, than
any 
other crop we can produce here. We have plenty of hay for all our stock,
and 
perhaps 100 bushels of grain for seed. 
All the national holidays were observed with appropriate exercises by the
pupils, in which they took great delight, and acquitted themselves well.
The 
total expense of maintaining the school has been $181.82 per pupil for twelve
months. 
Condition of Mloquis.-The Moqui Indians are at present in their usual condition.
The rains have been light, but I think their average crops are secure, so
that 
their maintenance for the next year is not endangered. 
I can see little change in the habits and customs of the tribe. Their religious
ceremonies are kept up just as usual, in fact one ceremony occurred this
year 
which had not occurred before for seven years, and the snake dance is coming
off in three of the villages this week. 
However, they are building new houses much faster than the Government can
furnish roofs for them, and the most of those having new houses completed
are 
living in them during the summer" but after the crops are in I think
many will 
spend most of the time during the winter in the villages. Three families,
how- 
ever. spent last winter in their new houses, and have moved everything from
the 
villages. The Indians have built the walls, and we have put roofs, floors,
win- 
dows, and doors to twenty-six new houses during the year, at an expense to
the 
Government of $145 each. These are good substantial one-story stone houses,
averaging about 16 by 26 feet in size, mostly of one room. Several have com-
menced additions for kitchens and storerooips, and nearly every new house
has 
several more new ones started close to it, where relatives of the owner wish
to 
build and live; all of which seems to indicate that they intend in the future
to 
change their habitation permanently; but the force of their customs, and
espe- 
cially of their religious ceremonies, will make the change slow, as many
of them 
oppose the whole movement, and it is giving rise to a strife among them,
which 
-becomes more bitter as the departures increase. I think the majority of
the 
tribe is in sympathy with the efforts of the Government, but there is a large
fac- 
tion who keep out of all councils, and never fail to strike a blow in the
back when 
an opportunity offers. 
Water supply.-We have improved ten of the springs and made the water much
better and more available, and have material on hand for improving fifteen
or twenty more. There is a well auger here which works splendidly, and we
have sunk two wells, but found no water. We have engaged men to operate this
auger, and expect soon to hav-e it running continually, when we can dig three
wells per week. In this way I expect soon to discover whether or not water
can 
be developed within ordinary distance of the surface. While I have little
hope 
of finding much water, yet it is of such value in this country that the discovery
of only one or two good wells would be worth all the expense. 
The fall planting of wheat and rye succeeded on the school farm, where it
was 
planted during a rainy time, but failed where planted after the fall rains,
and 
we expect to try again this fall, for if it can be made a success, it will
be of more 
value to these people than any other crop. The Indians are doing some plowing
now for this purpose. The plans adopted by your office for the advancement
of 
this people have been kept steadily in view, and nothing else presented to
change 
the purpose of the Indians, and I think that substantial, hard won, progress
has 
been made. 
Very respectfully, 
R:ALPHt P. COLLINS, 
The COMMISSIONFI OFf INDIAN AFFAIRS. 


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