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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1892
61st ([1892])

Reports of supervisors of education,   pp. 619-646 PDF (13.1 MB)


Page 627

REPORTS OF SUPERVISORS OF EDUCATION.                  627 
The little Montana industrial school is situated 5 miles from Custer station
on the Northern Pacific Railroad. It is not a new school. It has a capacity
of 
50. It is a model school on a small scale. The building is really a large
cot- 
tage, rather crowded but, having a home-like appearance. The school is doing
excellent work, both schoolroom and industrial. They have a good farm and
quite good progress is made in wood shop work. 
Tongue River Reservation.-About 800 Cheyenne Indians occupy this reservation.
They are a wild and unprogressive lot. There are two schools, the Govern-
ment day at the asency on Lame Deer Creek, and the Catholic contract, St.
Labre. on Tongue River. The latter school was discontinued at the time of
my 
visit on account of lack of attendance. The attendance at the day school
was very 
irregular and small. The Indians send to school or not just as they choose.
There needs to be a good Government boarding school erected, and the strong
hand of authority stretched out and those children gathered into school.
They 
will be a menace upon the safety of their neighbors if it is not done. 
Winnebago and Omaha Reservations.-The Winnebago school has been in hard luck.
For some years it seems to have been woefully mismanaged, and just as it
was 
gaining a good position and doing excellent work, afire broke out (March,
1892) 
and burned it to the ground. It was a disaster, for this people are in great
need 
of the school. They are immoral and unprogressive, but the school was doing
good work for them. 
A portion of the school has been reassembled in other buildings, but nothing
like the former efficient work can be done. The school property here is very
valuable, the farm being one of the best in Nebraska. Grain and vegetables
of 
all kinds can be raised. as well as fruit. These people are self-sustaining
and 
are good workers, but they need to have their children in school to fit them
for 
the duties of citizenship, which they will soon come to. The school, when
re- 
built, should be raised to 100. 
The Omaha boarding school is an old and prosperous school, excellently man-
aged; it is doing excellent work. It is located in the most desirable pai't
of 
Nebraska, and agricultural industrial pursuits are advantageously taught.
Both 
these tribes are now allottee citizens, and as such assume the Privilege
of keeping 
their children from school too much. There are many out of school because
of 
lack of school accommodations. This school would be benefited by being in-
creased to 100. 
The Omaha Mission industrial school is a Presbyterian contract school. The
attendance during the past year has been small. The capacity of the school
is 
about 50. The location is on the west bank of the Missouri River. All the
schoolroom and industrial work was of a satisfactory character, and it is
to be 
regretted that they had no larger attendance. 
Santee.-Upon and connected with the reservation are the following schools:
Agency boarding, Santee normal training (Congregational contract), Ponca
and Flandreau day, and Hope (Episcopal contract). 
The Santee agency school is a fine plant, having a capacity for 125 pupils.
The school and dormitory buildings are good, but'the outbuildings are poor
and 
inadequate. The farm is excellent although too small. The school is well
equipped and is doing good work both in the schoolroom and farm. No attempts
have been made to carry other industrials except shoe-repairing. 
The Santee normal training school is a fine school and deserves the high
reputation it has gained. It is not like any other school. While following
the 
course of study and rules laid down for the Indian schools, it aims to go
farther. 
Earnest and faithful work is done in all departments, and many who leave
this 
school are fitted to become teachers. A school of theology is a part of the
in- 
stitution. It is an industrial school in the fullest sense. For the girls,
the 
course in cooking and sewing is more thorough than ordinary, and for the
boys, 
a very complete knowledge of wood and iron shop work, shoe and harness making
is given. The dormitories are comfortable and homelike, being separated into
several separate buildings with a matron for each. This is one of the oldest
and 
best schools in the Indian service. 
The Hope school is across the river from the reservation in the town of Spring-
field, S. Dak. Like all the Episcopal schools, it has a capacity of only
50. It is 
a model little school. The enrollment has been 21 boys, 26 girls. Instruction
in schoolroom and industrials excellent. Could not visit the day schools.
Yankton.-The Yankton inustrial boarding and the Episcopal contract school
for boys, " the St. Paul's." are the only -chio1s on this reservation
that receive 
Government support. 
The Government school was started in 1882 and for several years had a ca-.


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