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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1879
([1879])

Reports of agents in Oregon,   pp. 124-136 PDF (6.9 MB)


Page 134

134 
REPORTS OF AGENTS IN OREGON. 
There is a day school in operation here with seating capacity for 75 scholars,
with 
an average attendance of 22 scholars. The children show an aptitude for learning
and 
will compare favorably with white children of the same age, but as many of
the In- 
dians live ten, fifteen, and twenty miles from the school it is impossible
for their children 
to attend day school, and consequently they are growing up in ignorance for
want of 
a boarding school here. 
The missionary labors of Rev. L. L. Conrardy among these Indians are meeting
with 
good success, as is shown by the increased attendance at church. The number
of 
Christians at present is 450. They are, as a rule, sober and industrious,
and many of 
them have adopted the dress of the whites and live in good, comfortable houses.
These Indians, with few exceptions, wish to take their lands in severalty
and re- 
main on the reservation, but the persecution of the surrounding whites will
be apt to 
deter many of them from remaining. 
The vice of drunkenness is common among the pagan Indians here, and it is
almost im- 
possible to suppress the traffic, for no sooner is one batch of whisky sellers
disposed of 
than others take their place and the chances of going to jail for a month
or two, which 
is the only penalty attached to the offense. 
I transmit herewith the statistical information required. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
N. A. CONROYER, 
United Sltates Indian Agent. 
THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
WARM SPRINGS AGEXCY, OREGON, 
August 22, 1879. 
SIR: I have the honor to "submit the following as my annual report,
together with 
the statistics accompanying the same: 
NUMBER OF INDIANS. 
The number of Indians belonging to this reservation is, as near as can be
deter- 
mined, 522, of which 272 are males, and 250 females. During the winter months
the 
number exceeded 600, owing to a number of renegade Indians being brought
here by 
the military authorities, who had gathered them up along the Columbia River.
These 
Indians are known as the John Day's Indians, having for their leader He-ha-ney,
an In- 
dian who left this reservation about nine years ago. As soon as spring fairly
opened 
he uanceremoniously left, taking most of the John Day's and some of the Warm
Springs 
Indians with him, going across the Columbia with the ostensible purpose of
making a 
home on the Yakaima Reservation, but I have yet to learn that he has done
so. Those 
of the John Day's remaining deserve great credit for not following him, but,
instead, 
have taken up land, fenced in a portion of it, and put in some grain and
other crops. 
As near as I can determine, the increase of population, by births, exceeds
the deaths by 
5 persons, making a gain of that much over last years resident population.
EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS. 
During the year nine months school has been taught. The average attendance
dur- 
ing that time was 36. The largest average during any one month was 45, the
number 
of scholars being 63. The highest number of scholars any one month was 66,
being in 
last March, during which the average was 42.o. The lowest number of scholars
was 
in September last, which was 27, with an average of 9. 
On the 5th of February a boarding department was started in connection with
the 
day school, to the extent of furnishing all the scholars present a noonday
meal, which 
encouraged a larger and more regular attendance. This department was under
the 
charge of Mrs. I. G. Fee, who acted as matron with great acceptance, instructing
the 
girls how to do housework, and a number of Indian women how to cook, make
bread, 
&c. Rev. R. N. Fee, in addition to his regular duties as-a missionary,
gave consider- 
able time to teaching the more advanced scholars, with the view of making
interpre- 
ters of them. The teacher, Mr. C. H. Walker, and assistant, Miss Josie E.
Smith, per- 
formed faithful and efficient service in the school, the latter taking the
smaller 
scholars and beginners, who made rapid progress under her instructions. Aside
from 
this, she gave a number of the girls instructions in sewing. Taken altcgether,
the 
results for the year are more satisfactory and encouraging than for a number
of pre- 
vious years, if they have ever been equaled, Aside from the salaries of the
teachers, 
a nouting to but $1,020 (since the services of the assistant did not commence
till 


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