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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1905, Part I
([1905])

Report of the Indian inspector for Indian territory,   pp. 705-792 PDF (36.9 MB)


Page 727

REPORT OF INDIAN INSPECTOR FOR INDIAN TERRITORY.      727 
tribal schools in the Chickasaw Nation have been paid by the tribal 
authorities by the issuance of warrants, and the expenses of the 
boarding schools and the part of the expenses of the day schools 
paid from tribal funds are still so paid. The Indian appropriation 
act of April 21, 1904, appropriated $300,000 for the payment of 
school warrants of this nation and a list of such warrants was sub- 
mitted to and approved by the Department December 7, 1904, and the 
United States Indian agent at Union Agency designated to make the 
payment. A list of such school warrants certified to by the tribal 
authorities as being correct was furnished his office, but it was subse-
quently ascertained that a large number of warrants after being paid 
by the tribal authorities had been taken from the tribal treasurer's 
office and again circulated, and that such fact had been known to the 
tribal authorities at the time such list was furnished by them. There- 
fore, owing to certain irregularities discovered in the issuance and 
circulation of these warrants, payment was delayed and not com- 
menced until after July 1, 1905. Steps are now being taken to liqui- 
date the entire school indebtedness of the Chickasaw Nation. The 
matter of the recirculation of school warrants after being paid by 
tribal authorities is under investigation by the Department of Justice. 
SEMINOLE NATION. 
Heretofore the Government has had nothing to do with the Semi- 
nole schools, but under the appropriation act of April 21, 1904, 16 
day schools were established in this nation-14 for Indians and whites 
and 2 Jfor negroes. The United States school supervisor for the 
Chickasaw Nation also supervises these schools in the Seminole 
Nation. 
CREEK NATION. 
There are 10 boarding schools maintained by this nation, 7 for 
Indian children and 3 for negroes, and there have been also main- 
tained during the fiscal year 1905 69 day schools for Indians and 
whites and 38 for negroes. The total enrollment at the schools of 
the Creek Nation during the year was 6,786, at a total expense of 
$79,099.01, as compared with an enrollment of 2,547, at an expense of 
$76,159, for the fiscal year 1904. 
The national council makes appropriation for the maintenance of 
the tribal schools, and warrants are drawn by the principal chief for 
the same, such warrants being paid by the United States Indian agent 
partly from tribal funds and partly from the appropriation by 
Congress. 
CHEROKEE NATION. 
There are 4 boarding schools maintained by the Cherokee Nation, 
and during the fiscal year 1905 had an enrollment of 547. There were 
117 combined day schools, at which 2,131 Cherokee and 5,199 white 
pupils were enrolled; 4 negro schools, with an enrollment of 237, and 
129 day schools, supported entirely by tribal funds, at which 5,160 
Cherokee pupils were enrolled. The total enrollment at schools in 
the Cherokee Nation was 13,274, and the total expense $133,725.84, 
as compared with an enrollment of 5,922, at an expense of $110,821, 
for the fiscal year 1904. 


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