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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1905, Part I
([1905])

Reports concerning Indians in Oklahoma,   pp. 291-323 PDF (15.9 MB)


Page 322

322     REPORTS OF TRE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 
census is given below, however, and is as nearly correct as I am able to
make it 
under existing circumstances: 
Absentee Shawnee                                          460 
Males over 18 years of age_                 -    175 
Females over 14 years of age-                    176 
Children between 6 and 16 years of age- .109 
Citizen Potawatomi -----                               1,680 
Males over 18 years of age .      -   --        611 
Females over 14 years of age-                    610 
Children between 6 and 16 years of age-----------459 
Mexican Kickapoo_-                               --      247 
Males over 18 years of age           --102 
Females over 14 years of age                     112 
Children between 6 and 16 years of age  -    -  33 
Total Indian population                           2, 387 
The population as given in my last annual report was 2,620, and in explanation
of the apparent decrease I would state that a considerable number of the
Absen- 
tee Shawnee have reliquished their rights at this agency and taken them up
again as Creek or Seminole Indians in the Indian Territory. Again, there
are 
a number of the Citizen Potawatomi Indians who have left the reservation
and their whereabouts is not known. The Indians of this agency are increas-
ing, and not decreasing. 
Education.-Although we have been compelled to live in and to conduct the
entire school work in temporary quarters during the whole of the school year
just closed, it is a great pleasure to be able to state that satisfactory
progress 
was made in all departments of the school work. During the time that we have
occupied temporary quarters the employees -have given the best of testimony
as 
to their devotion to the work in hand and in turn the pupils have responded
with a bright cheerfulness which plainly discloses their persistent faith
that 
a better time both as to school equipment and as to their station in life
is sure 
to come. The regular class-room and industrial work has been carried on as
usual, unless it be that more outside work has been adopted; and the class-room
work is frequently conducted out of doors, in the garden or woods or wherever
a suitable text from nature can be found which will cover the work in hand.
Improvements.-Contracts have recently been awarded for the erection of 
two new brick dormitories, one new brick domestic hall, and one complete
sewer 
system. A new class-room building and a small hospital will complete the
school plant at this place to the extent that it will be one of the best-equipped
small plants in the service. 
Agency.-The agency work has been difficult, owing to the many complicated
heirship matters in connection with the sale of heirship Indian lands. There
were originally some 2,760 allotments under this agency, thus making the
leasing 
of the same a large and difficult task. 
A very unfortunate event occurred in the passage of a clause in the act of
Congress approved March 3, 1905, which removes the restrictions from seven
Kickapoo allotments, six of which are located adjacent to or near the city
of 
Shawnee and are so located as to make valuable town-site additions to the
city. 
Unless some legal steps are taken to prevent the passing of title from the
Indians interested they will soon have lost property worth no less than $100,000.
This matter certainly represents a gigantic fraudulent scheme, and. should
be 
most thoroughly investigated with the view of giving the Indians proper pro-
tection. 
The sale of intoxicants to Indians is still carried on to a considerable
extent, 
and I find it very difficult to convict the real saloon keepers or proprietors,
who, of course, are the real offenders. If a poor streetwalker is caught
giving 
an Indian whisky it is a very easy matter to secure his conviction and sentence,
but in some manner the real saloon man finds it possible to have his case
delayed and postponed from  one court to another until the witnesses have
mysteriously left the country. 
Missionary work.-Near the school is located the missionary station of the
Friends, or Quaker Church, and the pupils of the school are encouraged to
attend Sunday school services there regularly. These kind people were good
enough to permit their church to be used by our teachers and pupils for class-
room work during a large part of the year just passed, or ever since the
fire 
at this school. 


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