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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1905, Part I
([1905])

Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs,   pp. 1-155 PDF (58.6 MB)


Page 45

45 
COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
Location, capacity, enrollment, and average attendance of Government day
schools during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905-Continued. 
Capac- Enroll- Average 
Location.                      ity.   ment. attend- 
ance. 
New Mexico-Continued. 
Pueblo-Continued. 
Jemez--------------------------------------------------------------- 8 1
Nambe-------------------------------------------------- 28 22     11 
Picuris .   ..------------------------------------------------- 16  16  13
Santa  Clara . . .   .   .   .   ..---------------------------------------------329
San Ildefonse . . . ..--------------------------------------------. 21  34
 26 
San Juan --------------------------------------------------  32  27  25 
Ss-----------------------------------------------------  3  7  2 
Taos---------------------------------------------------------- 3254  34 
North Dakota: 
Fort Totten (2 schools)--------------------------------------- 80  122  51
Fort Totten, W aanatan .. . . . ..--------------------------------  82  26
 16 
Fort Berthold (3 schools)------------------------------------------------10
90 76 
Standing Rock (5 schools)------------------------------------170  143  116
South Dakota: 
Cheyenne River (4 schools).. .    ..-----------------------------------9591
 74 
Pine Ridge (29 schools).. ..     ..       ..-------------------------------------.1,015
 739  582 
Rosebud (20 schools).. .. . ..   . .  . .  ..-----------------------------------
560 463  397 
Washington: 
Neah Bay..  . . .  . . . .  ..--------------------------------------------------.50.62
 46 
Quileute.  .    .    .    .    .    ..---------------------------------------------------
 42.59  31 
Tulalip- 
Lummi.    .   .   .   .    .   ..-------------------------------------------------
229  16 
Swinomish    ----------------------------------------44            7 
Port Madison--------------------------------------------- ---  30"41
 28 
Puyallup- 
Chehalis-------------------------------------------------------- 24  17 
Quinaielt------------------------------------------------ 30 22   13 
Skokomish . .   .    ..---------------------------------------------- 40
 36  16 
Jamestown .  .   ..--------------------------------------------- 24  18 
10 
Port Gamble-------------------------------------------- 26  27    17 
Wisconsin: 
Menominee- 
Attending Green Bay Boarding School (day pupils) 8........... - 32  20 
Stockbridge.. . .  .  . .  . . .  ..---------------------------------------
40  58  30 
La Pointe (5 schools).. .  ..----------------------------------------298.261
 191 
Total. .  .  .   .  .  .   .  .  .  ..--------------------------------------------------
4,874  4,399  ,271 
The complex nature of the Indian schools requires a large force of 
efficient employees to look properly after the moral and material wel- 
fare of the thousands of children enrolled. The following list of 
those employed during the year will be of interest: 
Supervisors, 7 white; superintendents, 117 white and 1 Indian; 
assistant superintendents, 14 white and 1 Indian; clerks, 56 white 
and 18 Indian; physicians, 29 white and 1 Indian; disciplinarians, 
23 white and 13 Indian; teachers, 450 white and 50 Indian; kinder- 
gartners, 41 white and 1 Indian; manual training teacher, 1 white; 
matrons and housekeepers, 215 white and 37 Indian; assistant ma- 
trons, 116 white and 49 Indian; nurses, 31 white and 2 Indian; 
seamstresses, 113 white and 43 Indian; laundresses, 88 white and 59 
Indian; industrial teachers, 68 white and 34 Indian; cooks and bak- 
ers, 144 white and 73 Indian; farmers, 50 white and 13 Indian; 
blacksmiths and carpenters, 65 white and 19 Indian; engineers, 55 
white and 27 Indian; tailors, 9 white and 6 Indian; shoe and har- 
ness makers, 16 white and 20 Indian; gardeners, 19 white and 6 
Indian; dairymen, 7 white, Indian assistants, 44; superintendents of 
industries, 3 white; teachers of agriculture, 6 white; day school in- 


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