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Information bulletin
(June 1951)

Ware, George W.
Porcelain, old and new,   pp. 29-35 PDF (3.9 MB)


Page [34]


aesthetically trained or the sophisticated. However,
almost anyone who develops an interest in porcelain
and has good taste, a good eye, and is willing to do a
reasonable amount of studying, consulting and observing,
should soon be able to make creditable selections.
At the same time he will begin to realize that porce-
lain, which is only one segment of the whole field of
ceramics, is so extensive in itself that it is desirable, if
not necessary, to concentrate his studies on one par-
ticuldr aspect of this broad field. For example, some
may desire to collect teapots of all shapes, sources and
ages; others only figurines, while some may -collect
almost anything of a certain factory or mark, a specific
period, or a definite style, color or composition. The
opportunities for collecting porcelain are almost un-
limited in Germany.
There is no direct or sure method for the average
person to follow in achieving expert proficiency in a
short time; but like all other hobbies, there are some
basic criteria and practices which will be found helpful.
The beginner should observe the following:
1. Acquire standard books, magazines and catalogs on
the general subjects and add more specialized ones as
interest and taste develop.
2. Study the photographs of famous pieces as it is im-
possible to see all of the originals. Glossy pictures of
artistic porcelain can be purchased from museums or
photographic agencies and most public libraries have
books on porcelain containing illustrations.
3. Visit shops, exhibits, auctions, museums and private
collections and learn to distinguish the good from the
bad. The habit of close critical observation must be
developed.
4. Study the porcelain factory marks. Although they
are often an unreliable clue to identification, a working
knowledge of them is necessary.
5. Buy a few representative authentic pieces from un-
questionable sources and use them as a basis for com-
parison with the items sought.
6. Cultivate an acquaintance or friendship with persons
who are interested and experienced in porcelain - col-
lectors, dealers, exhibitors and, if possible, ceramic
specialists in museums, They are usually willing to ad-
vise and some may take pride in actually assisting.
Table set in German fashion. Modern.
(CnrSers Q--1a-lUr   -- I-.-011a- f-
MTrade  darks of Old (18th Century) Factor
EISSEN (DRESDEN) 1710 TO DATE
X           2                X         i
17I 1i1 1722           3   172-0        725 TO 176i
IS  A A   >;        8TXA   1r1OX9 10
17?4 -i 1s   Lai$ 70 1560  1 -60 -1924  110i
HOCHST 174.6-96               NYMPHENBURG 1747 TO DAl
7    ,   0  2o  .     22   ,,    2*  71  26
I ~685                  Q)    a759572,8*0 82256
FORSTENBERG 1747- 59 . BERLIN KPM 1751 TO DATE
3*  0 rO DAT!J0 18                        I
J(ItK P Nt
FRANKENTHAL 1755-99  LUDWIG',BURG 1758l1b24
9#1~~~~~~~M MSB ...~                 s ..i.
6    Z 75; 1762-5  07859  AS$-OT 2N76*  7 5  2  3 580-*DC71750  90.04
ANSBACH 1757 1860  60THA 1757 VOLKSTEDT- RUDOLSTADT, 1760
TODATE      $      09
KLOSTER -VEILSDORF 1760 TO FULDA 1763-80 WALLENDORF 1764MT
i! Is * DATE             _      2L 6r$ * s   u ,DAT
MLENAU 1777 TO GERA 1779 TO DATE  RAUENSTEIN 1783 TO EISEI
s    O DATE                          To 7*  7   DATE  66
Trade marks of Germany's old or 18th century factor
are three-fifths their normal size. They are arrang
chronologically. Most of them are blue under the gla
but some are in other colors. A few of them are impress
THE OBSERVATION OF AT LEAST six factors Pi
Tbe found helpful in judging the quality and auth.
ticity of a piece of porcelain.
1. The factory mark, usually appearing on the bott
of the piece, is a good clue but not a guarantee of I
origin. Marks are generally reliable but some pieces i
falsely marked, others are copies, while some have
mark at all. The principal trade marks-shown in I
accompanying charts-may be helpful.
2. The body or paste of the material reveals its textu
degree of whiteness, translucency and general physi
quality. A good piece is fine-grained, uniform in co]
and reasonably free from defects. However, early Meism
and Vienna, and perhaps some other porcelains, have
green tone, are irregular in texture and translucent
and often possess light spots (called "moons" or "tare
when viewed by transmitted light.
JUNE


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