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Information bulletin
No. 145 (October 5, 1948)

Impact of currency reform,   pp. [18]-21 PDF (2.7 MB)


Page 19


and industrial figures on the German
side led the population to believe that
the first months after currency reform
would be a period of sacrifice and
hard readjustment.
Fortunately these gloomy predict-
ions did not materialize. Although
the German economic system, with its
dislocations and limited production in
key industries, continued to present
a mixed and somewhat unbalanced
picture, the prevailing impression,
nevertheless, was distinctly favorable.
C URRENCY REFORM created a
w psychological as well as a
material revolution in German life.
psychologically  it introduced  the
hope of better times and of improved
conditions. Cheer and optimism took
the place of the skepticism and pessi-
mism which previously prevailed. A
certain sense of the importance of the
individual was also recaptured.
Today the customer has resumed
his importance in the majority of
business houses in contrast to his
precurrency reform status. Politeness
to the public has returned in shops,
restaurants, hotels, railroad stations,
and in other places, where the cus-
tomer's money is once again re-
spected.
Evening service of street car sys-
tems in many cities has been
lengthened by one to three hours a
day. Gas companies now supply con-
sumers on a round-the-clock basis.
Retail shops have extended business
hours by earlier openings and later
closings and by the elimination of the
funcdi hour shutdown and the weekly
Half holidays. Railroad passenger and
bus fares have been reduced, and in-
*ereased efficiency has effected great
improvements in telegraph and long
,distance telephone service.
j Consumer resistance, for the first
time since the war began, has re-
turned to commercial life. Ersatz
articles, from baking flavors to per-
t furnes and fuels, have become un-
Saleable  even  at lowest  prices,
t t Whereas prior to currency reform,
i these ersatz commodities were fre-
quently the only items of their kind
available in the shops.
Consulme    resistance  is effecting
Vearnveents in quality and creating
PCoER S. l it,8
precurrency reform status. Politeness  German citizens at Duisburg-Hamborn,
in the Ruhr area of the British Zone, turn
to the public has returned in shops,  in old marks for new as currency reform
goes into effect.  (Photo by Byers, JEIA)
restaurants, hotels, railroad stations,
I.       Slmer resistance is effecting  A Munich miss receives her share
of Deutsche marks as a policeman displays
LtiProvements in quality and creating a placard announcing currency reform
in western zones of Germany. (PlO OMGB)
[0 ER S. A,4                                      19                    
            INFORMATION BULLETIN
precurrency reform status. Politeness
to the public has returned in shops,
restaurants, hotels, railroad stations,
and in other places, where the cus-
torner's money is once again re-
spected.
Evenin(l service of street car sys-
tems in many cities has been
lengthened by one to three hours a
day. Gas companies now supply con-
sumers on a round-the-clock basis.
Retail shops have extended business
hours by earlier openings and later
1416sings and by the elimination of the
nch hour shutdown and the weekly
alf holiddys. Railroad passenger and
s fares have been reduced, and in-
reased efficiency has effected great
improvements in telegraph and long
distance telephone service.
Consumer resistance, for the first
time since the war began, has re-
turned to commercial life. Ersatz
articles, from baking flavors to per-
furaes and fuels, have become un-
eable  even  at  lowest   prices,
Wsahlereas prior to currency reform,
itbese ersatz commodities were fre-
quently the only items of their kind
available in the shops.
Co"S"Mer resistance is effecting
Vernents in quality and creating
ER s, re'd


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