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Military government weekly information bulletin
Number 57 (September 1946)

[Highlights of policy],   pp. [4]-20 PDF (9.3 MB)


Page 20

visit to Berlin. Dr. M. E. Muelder of the
Control Office, OMGUS, oriented the group
on the organization of OMGUS and
the Allied Control Authority; Mr. Henry
Parkman, Chief of the Civil Administration
Division, on German governmental organi-
zation; and Major M. K. Wilson, Chief of
the Denazification Section, Public Safety
Branch, I A & C Division, on Military Gov-
ernment and Denazification.
PURPOSE OF MISSION
The educators are spending a month in
Germany at the invitation of Lt. Gen. Lucius
D. Clay, Deputy Military Governor, to make
constructive criticism !of Military Govern-
ment's policy and administration of the pro-
gram for the control of German education.
Following the general briefing in Berlin
the mission left for Wiesbaden, the first stop
in their Zone-wide tour. It will visit various
types of schools and universities, confer with
German Ministers of Education and their
staffs and meet with teachers and students of
all school types. It will meet the Ministers
President and German governmental, educa-
tional and cultural leaders. The last week
of the 30-day stay in Germany will be spent
in Berlin during which time the mission will
prepare a report on their findings and make
Plant Allocated to French
The Gross Kraftwerke, a power plant
located in Neckarau, near Mannheim, has
been allocated to France by the Inter-Allied
Reparations Agency. This is one of the first
suballocations among the western nations.
Built underground with heavy concrete
slabs, the plant represents the culmination
of thirty years research. It is the first of its
kind in Germany and was put into operation
by the Nazis as an auxiliary in case a sur-
face plant was bombed out. This plant was
capable of generating 32,000 KW at 22,000
volts, sufficient industrial electric power to
light a city of 200,000.
Construction of the plant, which cost RM
recommendations which will be submitted to
Military Government.
Members of the group, selected by the War
and State Department include Dr. George
F. Zook, President of the American Council on
Education, Washington, D. C., Chairman of
President Truman's National Commission on
Higher Education; Dr. Bess Goodykoontz,
Director, Elementary Education Division of
US Office of Education; Dr. Henry H. Hill,
President, George Peabody College for Teach-
ers, Nashville, Tennessee, President, Amer-
ican Association of School Administrators;
Dr. Paul Limbert, President of the YMCA
College, Springfield, Mass.; Dr. Earl
J. McGrath, Dean, College of Liberal Arts,
University of Iowa; Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr,
Professor of Applied Christianity, Union
Theological Seminary; the Rev. Felix New-
ton Pitt, Superintendent of Catholic Schools,
Louisville, Ky.; Mr. Lawrence Rogin, Director
of Education, Textile Worker's Union,
C. I. O.; Dr. Thomas V. Smith, Professor of
Philosophy, University of Chicago and mem-
ber of American Education Mission to Japan;
and Dr. Helen C. White, President of the
American Association of University Women.
Dr. Eugene N. Anderson, Occupied Areas
Division, Department of State, is accompa-
nying the Mission as a State Department
observer.
8,000,000, commenced in 1938 and was com-
pleted in 1941. The cost of construction was
provided for as early as 1926 when a loan
of 6,300,000 gold marks was obtained in the
United States, and secured by mortage on
the entire plant including the original in-
stallation. Stock in the firm is owned by the
Mannheim Electric Company and the Baden
Werke of Karlsruhe. The value of the in-
stallation in the United Sta'tes would be ap-
proximately $12,000,000.
The plant will net the French reparations
account about 4,000,000 RM according to
estimates of the Reparations Division, which
are based on a formula set up by the Quadri-
partite Commission at Berlin.
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