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Baldwin, M. W. (ed.) / Volume I: The first hundred years
(1969)

XV: The Second Crusade,   pp. 463-512 PDF (5.7 MB)


Page 512

512 A HISTORY OF THE CRUSADES I 
and his entente with Manuel were more than enough to alienate him.4°
 There was to be no epilogue to recover the fortunes of the Second Crusade
in Palestine. The vision of all the forces of Christendom on the march against
the pagan Slays and the Moslem world had been dissipated by the mixture of
military and non-military elements in the armies, divided leadership, conflicting
interests within Christendom, lack of knowledge and understanding of the
countries invaded, and the growing strength of the Moslems in the east. The
smaller, more concentrated, essentially military expeditions in Portugal
and Spain had achieved the successes of the crusade; and they foreshadowed
the shift from the vast miscellaneous outpourings of the First and Second
Crusades to the more limited personnel and more definite objectives of the
Third and Fourth Crusades. 
 40 Louis's letters to Suger (RHGF, XV), pp. 502, 509. R. Röhricht,
Beitrage zur Geschichte der Kreuzzüge, II (Berlin, 1878), p. 79, thinks
that the crusade cost the Germans about a million men. 


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