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Hazard, H. W. (ed.) / The art and architecture of the crusader states
(1977)

V: The Arts in Cyprus,   pp. 165-207 PDF (15.7 MB)


Page 204

 
204 A HISTORY OF THE CRUSADES  
the Pedias. Of its masonry nothing is now visible. James also improved the
castle of La Cava, which had been built by Peter II at the Nicosia end of
the route to Larnaca, whose importance as a port increased with the loss
of Famagusta. Built across the narrowest point of a long plateau which was
cut by a ditch, its meager ruins constructed in very massive bossed masonry
are noteworthy for their conservative character: two massive towers linked
by a curtain, recalling the early thirteenth-century sea castle at Sidon.
 If we pass over the isolated watch-towers, of which the best preserved,
at Kiti, is of Venetian date, there remain only the three hilltop castles
of the Kyrenia range—St. Hilarion (Dieudamour), Buffavento, and Kantara—and
what little survives of the fortifica tions erected by the military orders.
The three castles were first built by the Byzantines, probably not before
the opposite Cilician coast was overrun by the SeichUkids and perhaps as
part of the measures taken by Alexius I for the greater security of the island
after the revolt of 1092. Only at St. Hilarion does much remain of the original
work (fig. 11). Here there have survived from the Byzantine castle 
11.Plan of St. Hilarion 
— BYZANTINE 
 13 TH. CENT. 
 14TH CENT. 
 CONTOURS AT 5 MET RE 
 I NTE RVA LS IN U P PER 
 WARD ONLY 
 SCALE 
 10 0 10 20 30 40 50 


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