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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1892
61st ([1892])

Reports of supervisors of education,   pp. 619-646 PDF (13.1 MB)


Page 641

REPORTS OF SUPERVISORS OF EDUCATION.                    641 
dudicated than that of educating about twenty of their most promising young
men. As it would be no expense whatevor to the Government. it seems to me
that it would be wise to make the experiment. 
Ponca, Otoe, Pawnee, and Oakland REservafion-Under the jurisdiction of these
con- 
solidated agencies is a school population of 401. Ample facilities have been
provided in the erection and successful operation of three boarding schools
and 
one day school. Nearly every child of school agze among these tribes is now
in 
school. There have been several transfers made from all these reservations
this 
season to Haskeil Institute. Chilocco. and other nonreservation schools.
Sac and Fox Agency.-A boarding school at the agency, with a capacity of 130,
one near old Shawneetown. with a capacity of 90, and a contract school near
Sacred Heart, in the Pottawatomie country, afford the facilities for the
educa- 
tion of 500 Indian children that are on these reservations, or, more properly
speaking, under the jurisdiction of the Sac and Fox Agency, as the country
was 
opened up for settlement last year and these Indians suddenly thrown upon
their own resources. 
It is proposed to establish a school for the Pottawatomies, to be operated
in 
conjunction with the Absentee school. This will furnish facilities for at
least 
150 additional pupils, as the arrangement will increase the capamity of the
Shaw- 
nee school on the plan proposed for erecting a new school building. 
The Kickapoos, with a school population of nearly 100, have practically given
but little encouragement to any effort that has hitherto been put forth to
estab- 
lish schools for their people. The Friends' church has made several attempts,
I believe, to secure their coiperation in school matters, but with very little
suc- 
cess. There is a desire. however, among these people to do something towards
educating their children, and I think it would be wise to erect a building
that 
would accommodate not less than 75 and put their children in school. They
are a nonprogressive Indian and unless something is done looking forward
to 
bettering their condition they will remain dependents. 
INDUSTRIAL TRAINING SCHOOLS. 
Haskell Institute.-Those of us who are conversant with this institution,
who 
have been acquainted with its work from its earliest history, readily acknowl-
edge that it now enjoys a prosperity hitherto unknown to this school. There
are now 550 pupils in attendance, and the work in the various departments
has 
reached the highest standard attained by Haskell since its foundation. 
It seems to me that the time has come when the work of these institutions
might be more definitely particularized; that is to say, there are special
lines of 
training for which each school may be especially adapted. As, for example,
Haskell might emphasize the trades, in her industrial training, with farming,
gardening, and stock-raising, on a more limited scale. An advanced literary
course might be followed by a normal course of training, which would prepare
Indian young men and women for teaching amou their people and furnish them
with a profession by which they might be able to earn a livelihood anywhere
that their lot may be cast. 
It seems to me that the capacity of this institution should be increased
to ac-- 
commodate a much greater number of pupils. Near the Indian country, the 
item of transportation alone is important. The climate is not unlike a great
portion of the Indian country, contributing a large per cent of children
and 
youth who will attend these industrial institutions. The school is located
amid 
the very best civilizing influences. Under the shadow of the Kansas State
Uni- 
versity, ambitious young Indians will have the mental stimulus which an insti-
tution of the character of the university will give, together with the ever
strik- 
ing example of the great civilizing influences which cluster around Haskell,
and make its environments such that its possibilities as an industrial training
school for Indian youth are very great. 
Haworth Institte.-This institution is familiarly known as Chilocco industrial
training school and is located near Arkansas City, Kans., on the Cherokee
Strip. 
The institution has an immense tract of excellent land, to the amount of
8,640 
acres. This can be made the " great farm school "of the service.
All branches 
of agriculture Thould be taught here. It seems to me that the industrial
train- 
ing at this school should emphasize farming, gardening, fruit-growing. dairying,
stock-raising and the like, while the trades should receive only incidental
at- 
tention. The location of Chilocco is all that can be desired for the kind
 of 
school suggested. The conditions in farming here are very similar to those
with 
8397 I .----41 


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