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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1892
61st ([1892])

Reports of supervisors of education,   pp. 619-646 PDF (13.1 MB)


Page 633

REPORTS OF SUPERVISORS OF EDUCATION.                 633 
REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF EDUCATION, THIRD DISTRICT. 
IN THE FIELD, 
Reno, Nev., Auguist 20. 1892. 
SIR: I have the honor herewith to submit my first annual report of the third
supervisor's district, United States Indian smhools. 
SCHOOLS IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. 
Round Valley Agency.-Here a boarding school is being erected that will accom-
modate 80 pupils. It is pleasantly located, and will be provided with an
ample 
water supply under 200 feet pressure. The original boardingschool building
at 
Round Valley was burned in July, 1883. Since that two small iday schools
have 
been in operation. There are 80 pupils of school age on the reservation,
and it 
is estimated that there are 40 more living in the mountains contiguous to
the 
agency that are desirous of attending school. The school farm is of ample
size 
and great fertility, and affords excellent facilities for the instruction
of these In- 
dian youth in hop growing and horticulture as well as in general farming.
These Indians are in favor of the education of their children, and from their
contact with the whites have learned to esteem the knowledge acquired in
schools. 
Hoopa Valley Agency.-The withdrawal of the military from Fort Gaston will
enable the Department to utilize the buildings of the military post for the
es- 
tablishment of a large industrial boarding school. It is estimated that on
the 
agency and in the region of the Klamath River extending as far east as Yreka,
there are at least 250 children that should be gathered into this school.
These 
Indians are quiet. industrious, and self-supporting, and are anxious for
the edu- 
cation of their children. 
Day schools.-The day schools in the region of Ukiah, Cal., are doing excellent
work, and are well attended. 
At Upper Lake there is a band of 229 industrious Indians, including 34 chil-
dren of school age. These Indians are erecting a schoolhouse at their own
ex- 
pense, and have applied to the Government for a teacher. 
The Indians of Invo County, Cal., have been entirely without educational
fa- 
cilities until February last, when a day school was opened at Bishop. This
school has been very successful from the beginning. In April 56 children
were 
enrolled. While visiting the school I was impressed with the apparent eager-
ness to acquire knowledge that was manifested by the pupils. The children
came to the school neatly dressed. Many of them brought lunches nicely put
up in bright pails. It is estimated that there are at least 1,000 Indians
in Inyo 
County, including 200 Indian children of school age. These Indians are self-
supporting, and are very desirous of educating their children. The school
at 
Bishop should be increased to two departments and two teachers employed.
At 
Big Pine the Indians have erected and furnished a day-school building and
have 
requested that a teacher be sent them. Should the StewarL Institute be en-
larged to meet the necessities of the case it would find here a large field
from 
which to gather pupils. 
The Pit River Indians, in the region about Alturas, Cal., and extending west
for 100 miles into Shasta County, number over 800, including 190 children
of 
school age. They have no reservation, but are widely dispersed throughout
the 
country. Many of them have visited the schools of the Klamath Reservation
in 
Oregon, and are so much pleased with the results of Indian education there
that 
they deserve the establishment of a boarding school for their children. The
citizens of Modoc County, Cal., offer to donate to the United States an excellent
farm and school site of 320 acres for that purbose. These Indians are quiet,
in- 
dustrious, and moral, and are considered by the whites as a valuable factor
of 
the population of the country. The children are more than ordinarily bright
and healthy. 
SCHOOLS IN OREGON. 
Klamath Agency.-The schools of the Klamath Reservation have accomplished
a great work in the civilization and enlightenment of the Indians. These
Kla- 
maths and Modocs have abundant faith in the schools, and deem it a dire mis-
fortune if any of their children are refused admittance. 
I 


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