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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1892
([1892])

Reports of agents in South Dakota,   pp. 426-482 PDF (29.8 MB)


Report of agent in Utah,   pp. 482-487 PDF (2.8 MB)


Page 482

482 
and morality, then it will, contrary to their fears, bring to them a great
blessing. If, on the 
contrary, it shall lead the Indians tO begging and poaching upon their neighbors
and depend- 
ence upon others for supportwithout effort, then it will be a curse to both
parties. Could the 
stimulation to self-support be continued longer the danger it would seem
might be avoided. 
Respectfully yours, 
JOSEPH W. COOK. 
E. W. FOSTER, 
U. S. Indian Agent. 
REPORT OF MISSIONARY AND SCHOOL TEACHER AT YANKTON AGENCY. 
SIR: The Presbyterian day school is located at the agency. The expense of
maintaining it 
is borne by the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions. The employes are:
Teacher, 1. Num- 
ber pupils who can be accommodated, 20; whole number who have been enrolled
past year, 24. 
The average attendance has been 12. Cost of maintaining school: Salary of
teacher, $300; all 
other expenses. $100; total, $400. The greater number of our pupils are such
as are, from rea- 
son of disease or other misfortunes, not admitted at the boarding schools.
The mission sustains 3 churches at the Yankton Reserve. They are largely
supported by the 
communicants themselves, and native ministers preach. 
Statistics.- 
Missionaries employed..      .   .    .   .   ..      .   .   .    ..--------------------------------------------------
2 
Native preachers      -------------------------------------------------------2
Church organizations and buildings..       ..     .    ..     ...-------------------------------------
3 
Communicants...          ..      ..     ...        ..      ..      ..--------------------------------------------------------6341
Communicants received during the year..        ..    ...-----------------------------------26
Christian marriages solemnized...-       ............--------------------------------------.
12 
Contributions received from- 
Indians..................---------------------------------------------------------$650
Board of tuissions....        ............--------------------------------------------------700
1,350 
Expended: 
Education....           ..     .   ...       .    ...        .  ..--------------------------------------------------------
450 
Religious purposes...        ..      ..      ...        ..     ..-------------------------------------------------900
1,350 
Respectfully, 
E. W. FOSTER, Esq., 
U. S. Indian Agent. 
A. L. MILLER, 
Missionaryin charge. 
REPORT OF AGENT IN UTAH. 
REPORT OF UINTAH AGENCY. 
UINTAH AGENCY, August 16, 1892. 
SIR: As directed by you in office circular of June 23 last, I have the honor
to 
submit this my third annual report of affairs at this agency. 
UINTAH AND OURAY AGENCIES, CONSOLIDATED. 
Condition.-The year has been one of unusual activity in all departments o
agency work, including schools, and I am gratified to be able to note a marked
advancement in the condition and disposition of the entire tribes under my
charge. I mean-they are surely if slowly getting into closer touch with the
customs, laws, and methods of civilization. Especially are they beginning
to 
realize that civilization or eventual annihilation is the question that confronts
them. To this end I have steadily instructed them, and many of the more in-
telligent seem able to grasp the subject and to urge it upon their fellows.
But 
the longer I am with them the more thoroughly am I convinced that sudden
strides over the deep chasm that separates them from the higher nineteeeth
cen- 
tury civilization is not to be expected. "Here a little and there a
little" will 
well apply to the Indian for some time to come. 
I entirely agree with Dr. Dorchester that the tuniversal " reservation
school" 
is the true and economical method of elevating the masses of the Indians.
In 
their superstitious minds the returned and educated Indian of an Eastern
school 
is a "prodigy" not to b- emulated but rather feared and put through
the gaunt- 
let of ostracism and ridicule. I have found these Indians bitterly opposed
to 
sending their children off the reservation to any school. To any and all
appeals 
REPORT "OF AGENT IN UTAH. 


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