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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1883
([1883])

Report of Forest Grove school,   pp. 180-183 PDF (1.6 MB)


Page 181

REPORT OF FOREST GROVE           SCHOOL.               181 
higher school grades in rotation. There is also a Wednesday evening prayer-meeting
and a meeting Sunday evening for the employ6s' children and such as wish
to attend 
from outside of the school. These meetings are conducted by the superintendent
and 
employ6s, and a general invitation extended to all to participate. 
Reports from the different departments of the school are made, by employgs
in 
charge, below. Each pupil engages in some kind of work one-half of the time
and 
attends the school one-half of the time. 
Some of the larger boys have been allowed to work for the farmers in the
vicinity 
during harvest, and have given good satisfaction and received the same wages
as 
white men. 
Twenty-one of the smaller children were allowed to spend a few days with
the mem- 
bers of a church 18 miles from Forest Grove. They made friends for themselves
and 
the school, and recently there has been a proposition made by the same church
to 
give 200 acres of land to the school if it would be permanently located on
the land. 
FARMER'S REPORT. 
I have the honor to submit the following as the produce raised and growing
on 
the land cultivated by the Indian boys of this school: 
Cultivated 90 acres and raised- 
22 tons hay, at $20 ----------------------------------------------$440 00
3 tons oats...--.............--  . .. - - - - -  -  -  -  - -    168  00
20 tons straw, at $3  ....................................................
 60  00 
450 bushels potatoes, at 80 cents .........................................
 360  00 
52 bushels pease, at 60 cents ............................................
 31  20 
109 bushels radishes, at 50 cents .........................................
 54  50 
125 bushels onions, at $1- ..--.- .. ..... -- - ------------------------
125 00 
50 bushels beans, at $1.50 --. .....---...--- --.. --....................
 75 00 
20 bushels turnips, at 40 cents .........................................
 8  00 
9 bushels carrots, at 50 cents. ........................................
 4 50 
500 heads cabbage, at $1 per dozen- .----.-..-..-                   -......................
 41 66 
900 squash, at 5  cents.... ............................. ......I.........
 45  00 
1,412 86 
Owing to the season being so dry, not having any rain since the 17th day
of May, 
the crop did not turn out as well as it would if there had been rain. In
fact the 
school crop, owing to its being cultivated so much, is the best in this part
of the 
country, so far as I have seen. 
BLACKSMITH SHOP. 
I would respectfully report that the boys who are under my care in the blacksmith
department of the school have made commendable progress, better than I could
expect 
considering their former habits of life before entering the school. Their
deportment 
has been good, having never to my knowledge used bad language or misbehaved
themselves in a manner that could give offense to any one. 
The receipts of the shop for the year ending June 30, 1883, for work done
outside of school ---------------------------------.... $655 50 
W ork  done and  on hand ...................................................
 160  00 
815 50 
There are 6 boys working in the shop. 
SHOE SHOP. 
The shoemaker reports as follows for the last six months: All shoes and boots
worn by the children are made in the shop; also, all mending for the school
done 
in the shop. Work done in the shop from February 10, 1883, to August 10,
1883, 
amounts to $710.10. All parts of the work are done by the Indian boys, from
taking 
measures to finishing. At first they work slowly, but seldom spoil material,
and 
some of them have become quite expert workmen. There are "20 boys now
working 
in the shop, but some of them are quite young. 
PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 
The school physician reports as follows: The health of the school for the
last year 
has been comparatively good. There have been but few acute diseases of a
dangerous 
nature. Three have died. I attribute the small per cent. of deaths to the
fact that 
great care has been taken, by which the sanitary condition of the place has
been 
kept up to its highest standard. 


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