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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1883
([1883])

Reports of agents in Washington territory,   pp. 141-157 PDF (8.3 MB)


Page 149

REPORTS OF AGENTS IN         WASHINGTON     TERRITORY.        149 
allotments as the Indians wished to select and occupy on both the Tulalip
and Swin- 
omish Reservations, and he is now at work on the Lummi Reservation. Indians
who 
have roamed about the country have, of late, returned to their several reservations
and taken up land, and seem to feel a new interest in making something of
themselves. 
It is very evident to my mind, and is coming I think to be the prevailing
opinion in 
this part of the country, that the proper course for the Government to pursue
is, 
instead of keeping large and valuable tracts of land idle, on which an Indian
dare not, 
and a white mun cannot, make any improvements, to give to such Indians as
will use 
it what land they need or are entitled to under the varions treaties, with
such safe- 
guards as are needed to protect their ownership in it from the rapacity of
avaricious 
and unprincipled white men, and then dispose of the remainder to actual bona
fide 
settlers, and apply the proceeds towards the education of the children of
the several 
tribes entitled thereto. The example of the more energetic Caucasian will
stir up 
his more phlegmatic and untutored neighbor to greater efforts for himself,
and har- 
mony and good feeling towards the Government and the Indians will be likely
to 
exist in a greater degree than at present. On the reservations belonging
to the Nis- 
qually subagency the allotments have generally been made, but there is but
little 
record of them in the office, and there is need of much labor to get such
records as are 
needed arranged. 
The sanitary condition of the Indians is not encouraging. On both the Tulalip
and 
Puyallup Reservations the mortality during the past winter was very large.
The 
closer they are brought in contact with civilization the faster niany of
them seem to 
fade away. Those, however, who successfully pass as it were the shoals between
barbarism and civilization seem to improve, and the health of themselves
and their 
offspring is fairly good. 
Each of the three sub agencies has had the benefit of the labors of a missionary,
who has devoted his time to the religious welfare of the several parishes.
These are 
supported by the several denominations to which the agencies were originally
as- 
signed, and are Catholic, Presbyterian, and Congregational. There are eight
differ- 
ent church buildings owned and mostly built by the Indians, and in which
they meet 
to worship God, besides two other Government buildings which are also used
for the 
same purpose. As a rule the labors of gospel ministers have been as fruitful
among 
Indians as any other class of people, and the rule holds good among the indians
of 
Puget Sound. To the labors of these devoted men is largely due the sobriety,
indus- 
try, and good order of the various tribes. 
In conclusion I have to acknowledge with pleasure the kindness and co-operation
of the members of the various denominations with whom I have been called
to act, 
and the faithfulness of the' several employ6s who have aided me in my arduous
and 
at times oppressive duties. 
Very respectfully, 
EDWIN EELLS, 
United States Indian Agent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION, 
August 1, 1883. 
DEAR SIR: The time for making my annual report has arrived. In so doing I
have 
the honor to set before you the following facts concerning the educational
operations 
connected with the school and farm on this reservation: 
SCHOOL. 
There were 57 pupils in this school when I took charge last year, viz, on
November 
25, 188'2. Since that time 14 have been drafted into the Forest Grove training-school,
8 have graduated from the school and returned to their homes, 5 left school
on account 
of ill-health, of which number 2 died, making a total of 27. This has been
more than 
offset by the admission of 35 new pupils, most of them small, and very ignorant.
Of 
the pupils now in school, 59 are full-blooded Indians-35 boys, and 24 girls;
6 are half - 
caste children-viz, 4 girls and 2 boys.  * * 
GRADING OF SCHOOL. 
Thme school is regularly graded into two departments, each department occupying
a 
separate room, and being under the care of its own teacher. All the pupils
are required 
to be in school four hours in the forenoon of each day. The smaller pupils
spend 
an additional two hours doring the afternoons in the school-room, uder care
of the 
assistant teacher, who is a Normal School graduate, and a teachmer of ninny
years' prac- 
tical experience. 


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