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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1883
([1883])

Reports of agents in Oregon,   pp. 126-136 PDF (5.1 MB)


Page 134

134 
REPORTS OF AGENTS IN OREGON. 
the Indian language. Many who can read cannot or will not speak in English,
so 
that there are only about 41) Indians who can use the English language well
enough 
for ordinary conversation. We have been so accustomed'to the jargon language
that 
we understand them much better in it than when they try to make us understand
in 
English. But for all this I look with no favor upon the jargon language,
and always 
regretted the necessity for its use. 
NUMBER OF SCHOOL CHILDREN, ETC. 
I report 140 children of school age. Of this number there have been in school
80. 
Of these 70 were in school one month or more. Two schools have been carried
on 
upon this reservation-one at this agency called the "day and boarding
school," 
and one at the Sin-e-ma-sho Valley, about 20 miles northwest of this agency,
called the 
"Warm Springs Industrial and Boarding School." In the former school
was kept 
during eleven months, though but 202 days school was taught. The average
attend- 
ance during the time was 204. Largest attendance was in December last, whi
h was 
36 r out of 50 scholars enrolled. From the first of November to the first
of May a 
noonday meal was given to all the Indian scholars. Hence the name, "day
and 
boarding school." 
At the industrial school, sessions were held in every month of the year,
though 
but 190 days school was taught. The boarding-school commenced August 29 of
last 
year, with 7 scholars. This number increased up to 26 boarding and 4 day
scholars, 
in January of this year. The average attendance was 15kZ. Largest average
was in 
January last, and was 26J out of 30 scholars. There were employed in this
school 
one industrial teacher and one matron, until last June, when an assistant
teacher was 
employed. At the agency school there was one teacher, and for six months
a matron 
also acting as assistant teacher. At the latter school industries were taught
only to 
the girls, as most of the boys were too small; and, had they then been old
enough to 
perform labor, there were no facilities for carrying on indnstrial labors.
The girls 
were taught cooking, housekeeping, and plain sewing. The industrial school
has a 
garden of about 14 acres, which is doing quite well, notwithstanding the
long-con- 
tinued dry weather. None of the principal garden products are sufficiently
advanced 
or matured to form a correct estimate. The boys have been taught carpentering,
gardening, and the cutting of wood with ax and cross-cut saw. The girls were
taught cooking, sewing, and housekeeping. It has been difficult to keep the
children 
at this school. Their parents and friends do not fully appreciate the advantages
of 
the training we aim to give, and too often take the children's part, when
they run 
off home, on account of having been corrected, or from getting homesick.
APPRENTICES. 
During the year I have had but two, one assistant blacksmith and one assistant
sawyer. These two now-fill thepositionsofblacksmith and sawyer, formerly
filled with 
white employ6s. They give good satisfaction, and, while in some respects
they can- 
not fill the positions as well as skilled white mechanics, they can do all
that is really 
necessary in their line of work, with a little oversight on my part, or of
some of my 
white einployds. 
PHYSICIAN'S REPORTS, ETC. 
From these reports I find that 600 cases were treated, mostly among the Wasco
and 
Tenino Indians. The Warm Spring and John Days are not convenient to the agency,
hence seldom call for a physician, though they frequently procure medicines
for the 
more common ills, but in severe sickness they invariably call in their Indian
doctors. 
For a time I had hoped that they would abandon their belief in their medicine
men, 
but it is ingrained into their very beingfrom earliest infancy; and though
they some- 
times declare they have given up this belief, yet the very next critical
case finds them 
flying to these men for assistance. The agency Indians are, in a measure,
reclaimed, 
but have not altogether abandoned their belief. It is doubtful whether the
present 
generation ever will be fully reclaimed. My principal hope is with the rising
genera- 
tion, though many of them will grow up with more or less of Indian superstitions
in- 
stilled into their minds. 
The mortality has been very large during the year as compared with the past,
as 
there were 30 deaths; of these 20 were near the agency; two were accidental;
a 
majority of the balance were chronic cases or old people. 
MISSIONARY WORK. 
This has been carried on almost entirely by myself and employ6s. Services
have 
been maintained throughout the year, at both this agency and the Sin-e-ma-sho
Valley upon nearly every Sabbath. The world's week of prayer was duly observed,


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