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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1883
([1883])

Reports of agents in Oregon,   pp. 126-136 PDF (5.1 MB)


Page 133

REPORTS OF AGENTS IN OREGON. 
exacted, and the fine should be enough to reimburse the Government, cost
of trans- 
portation, &c. I am pleased, however, to notice that the cases, so far
as the Indians 
are concerned, are but few for the past three or four months, of this nature,
and 
accompanied with no aggravating circumstances, except in one instance, last
May, 
where an Indian was killed at McKay Creek-a case of justifiable homicide,
according 
to the decision of the court here. Whisky was the cause, as well as the cause
of the 
murder of a white man on this reservation last February.  Four Indians are
now 
undergoing sentence of 10 years in the Oregon penitentiary for this offense.
All the 
facts were reported to the Department at the time of the occurrence. 
During the mouth of July I, together with my employ6s, was working at the
saw- 
mill (17 miles from here), fixing the mill-race, flume, and dam, which we
succeeded in 
placing in proper working order. Owing to the fact that the number of my
employgs 
(exclusive of physician and school employds) has been reduced to three, I
will not be 
able to accomplish the work I intended. The half-breeds or mixed bloods and
In- 
dians have hired a sawyer, whom they pay themselves, to saw sufficient lumber
for 
their present needs. This is a move in the right direction, and will tend
to develop 
the resources of the Indians here, without in any way (except so far as the
use of 
machinery is concerned) being an expense to the Government. 
The boarding-school constructed last year has been in progress since January
1, 
1883, and so far the results are satisfactory; although so far 45 is the
number of schol- 
ars, yet I hope to be able to raise the number to 75. On the 12th of May
last I issued 
to the boys an ample supply of clothing, generously furnished by the Government;
also some to the girls, to their great gratification, as well as their parents.
There are 
at the Forest Grove school some 18 children of this agency. With some few
excep- 
tions the report of the superintendent, Mr. Minthorn, is favorable. 
The police have been zealous and efficient in the performance of their duties,
and 
look after everything on the reservation with vigilance. I trust my recommendation
for a subsistence allowance, as shown in my last estimate of funds, may meet
with 
approval. 
The health of the reservation is good; although a good many cases appear
in my 
sanitary report, yet there are none of a very serious character. 
For official courtesies extended by the honorable Commissioner and his officers,
for 
the short period I have been in office, my thanks are due; also for valuable
assistance 
rendered by the district attorney and the United States Commissioner. Statistics
enclosed. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
E. J. SOMMERVILLE, 
United States Indian Agent. 
The COMMIsSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
WARM SPRINGS AGENCY, OREGON, 
August 14, 1883. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following as my annual report for the
year 
ending July 31, 18t3. 
INDIAN POPULATION, ETC. 
As no regular census has been taken during the year, I can only arrive at
the total 
number of Indians by referring to the records of the births and deaths as
far as such 
items have been reported. From these I find that there were 19 births and
30 deaths; 
excess of the latter over the former, 11. To this add 15 Piutes, who have
either re- 
moved to the Yakama Reservation. or ran off to their former country: there
is a total 
loss of 26. This taken from the 835 reported last year leaves 809, made up
as follows: 
W arm  Springs...................................................... 
W ascoes  ............................................................ 
Teninoes  ............................................................ 
John  Days  .......................................................... 
:Piutes  .. ...................................................  ..........
Males.     Females.     Total. 
192         233         425 
123         127         250 
35          40          75 
26          23          49 
7           3          10 
Among these are included the 5 mixed bloods. 
There are at least 700 persons who who]ly wear citizen's dress, and 109 who
do so in 
part. About 80 persons can read, and quite a number can write in English.
The 
latter is the only language taught. No papers or books have ever been published
in 
133 
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