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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1856
([1856])

[Central superintendency],   pp. 65-131 PDF (28.8 MB)


Page 69

CENTRAL SUPZIRINTENDENCY. 
able to both parties, and.greatly relieve the inhabitants of that region,
and travellers passing through the country. The farm of the Omahas 
is now in a flourishing condition.          :i 
The appointment o' an sgtnr of their owii, and the establishment 
of a mission building, which is now in course of construction, have 
reconciled them to their reserve, which is every way adapted to their 
wants. 
The Ottoes have had.some prairie land broken and planted for them 
this year, on their reserve, but I esteem it very unfortunate that their
agent has not yet made his appearance amongst them; should he 
not be sent there soon, I fear that there will be, as heretofore, much 
suffering among this tribe during the ensuing winter. 
The farm at the Great Nemaha agency is in a good state of cultiva- 
tion, and the tribes of that agency appear to have realized the neces- 
sity of betaking themselves to the cultivation of their own farms; they 
are, I am pleased to add, less addicted than formerly to the use of 
ardent spirits. A band of the Sacs of Missouri (Ne-sono-quot's) still 
remains upon the Kickapoo lands; on a recent visit to these tribes, I 
urged upon the Sacs the necessity of their immediate removal to their 
proposed home. They, as an excuse for remaining, made certain 
complaints, which induced me to order a general coucil of the Mis- 
souri Sacs at the Nemaha agency, and to instruct Agent Baldwin to 
hear and examine into the complaints made by the Indians, and to 
report the result to this office. Should this investigation establish 
any important facts, it will be made the subject of a future report. 
The Iowa mission contains about forty children of both sexes; 
upon examination, I found that they had attained a respectable pro- 
ficiency in reading, writing, &c. In addition to those branches, the
girls are instructed in needlework, cooking, and general housework; 
the boys cultivate a farm of eighty acres of corn with great neat- 
ness, and have a heavy crop ripening for the harvest. The children 
are healthy, cheerful, well clothed, modest, and polite in their deport-
ment. As the cultivation of the farm upon the agency reserve is- 
limited to the present year, it will be sown in wheat and other small 
grain, unless otherwise directed by the department. 
The section of land upon which the agency and farm are situated 
is fertile and very valuable; and it may be well to consider the pro- 
priety of giving some orders in relation to it.       o 
The Kickapoos are now all settled upon their new reserve, cultiva- 
tinkg their farms with success. 
The purchase of cattle ordered by the department has been made 
by their agent, and is a great addition to the comfort of these Indians.
They.will have an abundance of hay for the forage of their horses and 
cattle during the ensuing winter. 
All of the tribes settled upon reserves, and others who are disposed 
to cultivate the soil, should be furnished with a sufficient number of 
milch cattle and oxen, which will not only increase their comfort 
and give variety to their occupations, but accustom them to realize 
and appreciate the value of fixed property. All the country inhabited 
hy the Indians is adapted to the raising of stock; and the transition 
of the savage to the condition of the heardsman is easier than that of 


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