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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1905, Part I
([1905])

Report of the Indian inspector for Indian territory,   pp. 705-792 PDF (36.9 MB)


Page 728

728     REPORTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 
The expenses of these schools have been paid by the United States 
Indian agent, the proper proportion from tribal funds and the bal- 
ance from the Congressional appropriation. 
By direction of the Department, after July 1, 1905, all expenses 
in connection with the-maintenance of schools will be paid by Mr. 
John D. Benedict, superintendent of schools in Indian Territory, 
instead of by the United States Indian agent. 
TRIBAL REVENUES. 
No action was taken by this office in reference to the collection of 
tribal revenues during the first part of the year, such matters being 
handled by Mr. S. H. Taylor, revenue inspector, assisted by inspect- 
ors assigned to various districts throughout the Territory, acting 
under the direction of the Indian agent. On February 10, 1905, 
however, this matter was placed under the direction of this office, and 
on May 1, 1905, the office of revenue inspector was abolished and the 
matter handled by this office direct. 
The only tribal revenues collected-by the Department in the Choc- 
taw and Chickasaw nations are the tax of 25 cents per head on cattle 
introduced and held in the Chickasaw Nation by noncitizens and the 
tax of 20 cents per head on cattle introduced and held in the Choctaw 
Nation by noncitizens. 
When this office assumed charge of the matter of collecting these 
taxes, it was ascertained that cattle owners for some time had been 
refusing to pay the tax until the United States Indian police arrived 
for the purpose of removing the cattle, when they would at once ten- 
der payment, which was accepted by the United States Indian agent 
and the cattle not removed. 
It was therefore determined to take vigorous measures to enforce 
the collection of this tax, and public notice was given that where 
any person refused or neglected to pay the tax due after having been 
served with proper notice and an order had been issued for the 
removal of the cattle owned or held by such person, any money there- 
after tendered in payment of said taxes would not be accepted, but 
that the cattle would be removed from the limits of the nation unless 
the owner thereof, in addition to all taxes due, voluntarily tendered 
the sum of $1 per head to cover the expenses of the police party sent 
to remove his cattle. Instructions were given the district revenue 
inspectors that if the cattle owner was willing to do this the order for
the removal of his Cattle should be temporarily suspended and such 
amount remitted to the United States Indian agent, when the matter 
would be taken up with the Department, and if such action was 
approved the money would be accepted and the order of removal 
revoked. The matter was also taken up with the Department and 
such action approved, and the regulations governing the collection 
of these taxes in the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations were amended 
accordingly. 
There was considerable opposition among the cattlemen to paying 
this $1 per head in addition to the taxes to cover the expenses in- 
curred by the police parties, but after the matter was thoroughly 
understood and the cattle of a number of persons had been removed, 
others preferred to voluntarily pay $1 per head than have the order 
removing their cattle enforced, and other delinquents hastened to 


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