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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1905, Part I
([1905])

Reports of superintendents of independent schools,   pp. 415-440 PDF (11.7 MB)


Page 426

426     REPORTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 
REPORT OF SCHOOL AT GENOA, NEBR. 
GENOA, NEBR., August 25, 1905. 
The new power house and extension of steam and electric-lighting system 
was completed during the year. This is proving better in every way than the
old. Steam heat was installed in the employees' quarters. The new water 
plant was also installed. It has proved efficient, giving abundance of good
water. The water is found to be much softer than what we used before. It
does not scale the boilers to anything like the same extent. It is also free
from 
contamination. 
An ice house was built, with capacity of 200 tons. A meat room and refrig-
erator on one side of the ice house was constructed, so that meat can be
kept 
better than in the old room over the power house and next to the bakery.
A cement walk was put down in front, and the brick from the walk was 
used to make back walks to displaie wooden walks. 
Much attention was given to agricultural teaching, both in the schoolroom
and in the field. All pupils receive instruction in nature study along agricul-
tural lines, the most advanced pupils taking up Bailey's Agriculture as a
text- 
book under the teacher of agriculture. Planting seeds and cultivating plants
is made part of the schoolroom exercises. Classes are taken to the garden
and field and orchard, and given the practical work. Classes of boys and
girls spend considerable time in the orchard pruning trees. They planted
a 
young orchard, large strawberry, asparagus, and rhubarb patches. A great
variety and abundance of vegetables has been raised along with the teaching.
Every large boy gets a course in milking and feeding cows. The dairy has
given very good results. A herd of 28 cows gave over 16,000 gallons of milk
for the year. The dairy herd is not as large as it should be, owing to the
fact 
that the school farm will not give pasture and forage for a larger herd.
The 
school farm contains about 300 acres. This includes campus, barnyards, 
orchard, garden, pasture, and farm land. We can not raise calves or colts.
With more land we could raise the calves from the dairy, raise some colts,
and 
teach the pupils how to care for these animals. The dairy herd could be 
doubled, and would furnish not only milk but sufficient butter for the school.
The dairying industry is a very important one, and is rapidly growing here
and in the entire region from which our pupils come. While our pupils are
getting a good deal of dairying, we can not make the teaching complete with
this small farm. 
The farm is in a better shape to give good results than it has been heretofore.
Drain tile has been put in to reclaim land that had become too wet in the
last 
few years to produce anything. This, with the open ditching done, will add
considerably to the fertility of the farm. 
Red clover is being raised both for forage for cows and to increase the fer-
tility. It is proving a great success. Red clover and alfalfa are proving
very 
valuable crops. 
The work in schoolrooms has supplemented agricultural and other indus- 
trial work. The gospel of independence gained by hard work has been steadily
taught. 
W. H. WINSLOW, Superintendent. 
REPORT OF SCHOOL AT CHILOCCO, OKLAHOMA. 
CHILocco AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL, OKLA., August 3, 1905. 
The present condition of the school plant is excellent. During the year just
closed several improvements of importance have been made, which add greatly
to the comfort, convenience, and efficacy of the institution. The water supply
has been increased, so that now for the first time in many years there is
suf- 
ficient for domestic purposes. When the present supply furnished by wells
and springs is reenforced by a large reservoir that is in contemplation and
that 
we hope soon to construct, this school will be amply supplied with water
for 
all purposes. 
Leupp Hall, the name given to the large, handsome building just completed,
and which is to be used for purposes of domestic economy, adds greatly to
the 
appearance and efficiency of the domestic side of the school. 


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