University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The History Collection

Page View

United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1904, Part I
([1904])

Reports concerning Indians in Arizona,   pp. 131-155 PDF (12.5 MB)


Page 139

REPORTS CONCERNING       INDIANS IN     ARIZONA.         139 
The water supply here is inadequate, water being hauled for drinking purposes
1 mile 
from a well in the valley. Two large wells 16 feet in diameter, one for the
school 
and one for the Moqui, furnish water for laundry purposes, but it is not
good for 
drinking. 
Increase in attendance.-The following table shows the increase in attendance
at 
the various schools since I took charge in 1889: 
Average 
School.                        attendance. Increase. 
1899.  1904. 
Per cent. 
M oqui training..............................................................-
.  83  195  135 
Polacca ......................................................................
 24  45  90 
Second Mesa day. . .  .    .  .  .   .  .  .  ..-------------------------------------------------.
19  84  342 
Oraibi day...................................................................23
 164  613 
Average net increase. . . . .  .   .  .   ..-----------------------------------------
149  488  228 
Indian courts.-This little tribunal has accomplished good work during the
year, 
relieving the agent of many petty details. There have been no serious crimes
or 
misdemeanors committed during the year. I believe that this court deters
a great 
deal of crime and misdemeanor. 
Missionary work.-Two missions have been maintained by the Woman's Baptist
Home Mission Society-one at Polacca and the other at Second Mesa. Misses
McLean, Schofield, and Johnson are the devoted ladies who are giving their
lives to 
this work. Considerable progress has been made toward the conversion of the
Indians, especially at First Mesa, or Polacca. 
The Mennonite mission board maintains a mission at t)raibi under charge of
Rev. 
J. B. Frey. A commodious mission chapel has been erected, where services
are 
regularly held. 
Trading posts.-Three trading posts are kept on the reservation by white men.
All have done a fairly good business, and so far as this office is-aware
the Indians 
have been treated justly and fairly. Several young Indians have started trading
posts themselves and are doing fairly well. This places them in an independent
sphere, and causes them to depend more and more upon their own efforts to
get 
along. It is also the most powerful factor toward civilization. 
Field matrons.-These good women have done an immense amount of good. At 
the First Mesa, Miss Sarah E. Abbott's work shows for itself in the clean
homes and 
yards and the higher life of the people. At Oraibi, Miss Miltona M. Keith
is striving, 
against almost despairing odds, to elevate the people and encourage clean
homes and 
better living. At this village, however, are 1,000 people huddled together
in a small 
place, and a great part of them so-called hostiles, and it is slow work getting
them to 
change their customs of a thousand years. Little by little her faithful work
is telling., 
Earnings by Indians- 
Sale of wood-............................................ $1,080. 00 
Sale of coal.....................................-     600.00 
Sale of beef.--...........................................2,000.00 
Irregular labor  -----------------------------------2, 700.00 
Freighting  ---------------------------------------2525.00 
Total.    .    .     .    .    ..------------------.-------------------8,905.00
To this should be added moneys earned by freighting for traders, sale of
baskets, 
plaques, and blankets, which will amount up. into the thousands. 
Sanitary.-Mention was made above of the scarlet fever in the Moqui school.
It 
also swept through the Moqui villages, and owing to the filthy homes and
little care 
shown the sick many children died. Every effort was made by the physician,
but 
as he had nearly a hundred cases in the Moqui school he had his hands full
without 
the villages. The field matrons did well to visit the sick and do what they
could to 
alleviate the sick., 
For the coming fiscal year your office has authorized the employment of a
second 
physician, whose whole time will be spent with the villages and adult Indians.
Much good is hoped for, and also he will be expected to enforce sanitary
regulations 
concerning clean streets. 


Go up to Top of Page