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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1904, Part I
([1904])

Reports concerning Indians in Arizona,   pp. 131-155 PDF (12.5 MB)


Page 138

138        REPORTS CONCERNING INDIANS IN            ARIZONA. 
During the present fiscal year it is proposed to establish a more complete
census, a 
register of families, a record of births and deaths, etc., for the Indians
above 
enumerated. 
Pupil's earnings.-Since my last annual report pupils have earned cash from
labor 
as outing pupils, laborers on railroads, in shops, on steamboats, brickmaking,
and 
other work for contractor of new buildings, etc., $1,795.31. 
Conditions seem favorable for the prosperity of this school for the present
fiscal 
year. 
Official visits.-The school was visited officially during the past year by
Inspector 
Frank C. Churchill, and by Supervisor Charles H. Dickson,'both of whom were
helpful and encouraging in many ways. 
Very respectfully,                        DUNCAN D. McARTHUR, 
Superintendent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
REPORT OF SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT IN CHARGE OF MOQUI. 
MoQui TRAINING SCHOOL, 
Keams Canyon, Ariz., July 15, 1904. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit this my sixth annual report of the Moqui
Agency 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904: 
Moqui training school.-This school is located 85 miles north of Holbrook,
Ariz., 
the nearest railroad station. Mail is carried three times per week on horseback.
Employees must pay $20 for the trip to-the school. 
The attendance has been excellent, averaging 195 for the year in spite of
the scar- 
let fever, which raged for the last six months of the year. One hundred cases
occurred and only 6 deaths, and some of these ought not to be charged up
to the 
scarlet fever entirely. Most Indian children are diseased in some way, and
the 
Moqui and Navaho are no exception to the rule. 
Two classes have been transferred to nonreservation schools-one to Chilocco
and 
one to Riverside. 
The work of the school has been good. Employees have been faithful and willing
to do extra duty, owing to sickness of both employees and pupils. The beautiful
new school buildings made it a joy for us to work, after living so many years
in mud 
shacks. 
Polacca day school.-Mr. Charles W. Higham and wife have managed this school
very successfully most of the year. During the first two months Mrs. Alice
C. 
Peairs, assisted by Mrs. Mary Zielian, carried on the school successfully
until the 
appointment of Mr. and Mrs. Higham. The attendance is about 45, mostly small
children. Every child of school age in the three villages which support this
little 
school are either in that school or at the Moqui boarding school at Keams
Canyon, 
15 miles away. The people are happy to send their children to school and
there is 
every promise that this mesa is taking on civilization rapidly. 
A large well 10 feet in diameter has been dug and walled up solidly with
stone. 
This will supply the school with ample water for its need. A good bath house
and 
waterworks system will be put in the coming summer, which will make Polacca
one 
of the finest little schools in the service. 
Second Mesa day school.-This school, located 20 miles from Keams Canyon,
the 
seat of the agency, is the second largest school of its kind in the United
States. Mr. 
A. H. Viets and wife preside over its destinies well indeed. There are three
school 
buildings and the employees' cottage. The roof of one of the school buildings
needs 
repair, which will be attended to shortly. 
The attendance has not been so good as in the past, dropping from something
over 
100 to about 84 owing to the transfer of pupils to Keams Canyon and to nonreserva-
tion schools and a failure to push the people to put in their young children.'
Oraibi day school.-This great school is located 35 miles from Keams Canyon,
and 
is the largest day school in the United States. The attendance has averaged
over 160 
for the entire year. The principal teacher, Mr. Glen C. Lawrence, has had
a Hercu- 
lean task on his shoulders and deserves great credit for carrying it so well.
One new stone building was completed during the year and the teacher with
all 
his other duties, with the help of the teamster, built the walls of a large
stone build- 
ing, 18 by 40 feet, and it only needs the roof and doors, etc., to make it
a beautiful 
cottage for employees. A large stone schoolroom was built a year ago for
this school, 
which gives ample room for the 170 children enrolled.   - 


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