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Military government weekly information bulletin
Number 72 (December 1946)

Press and radio comments,   pp. 23-28 PDF (3.3 MB)


Page 23


Bizonal Agreement Viewed as                   Elmner Daivs:  "Thll
beginning toward makii
First Sfep    to  Economic      Unity       supporting. Not in their i
'rihe recent agreement betveen the United  Not merely for reasons c
States and Britain for economic unification  prevent them from becomi
of the British and American Occupation      of disease, malnutrition, a
Zones in Germany was regarded by US press   would make them a dangel
and radio as a much needed first step toward  once again. It looks like
relieving the victor nations of the cost of  will require a greater init
indefinitely supporting the German economy.  the present arrangement,
Comment made the point that the British-    to cost us less both in meo
American move was in accord with the Pots-  in the long run."
dam Agreement calling for economic unifica-   Radio commentator Da
tion of Germany and expressed the hope that  portant as this new agr(
economic unification can be extended to the  and Americans) regard i-
French and Russian Zones.                   step toward achieving the
The New York Times regarded the agree-    Germany as a whole a
ment as a move "to put an end to the        agreed upon in the Potsd;
anomalous situation which compels the United  governments are ready ai
States and Great Britain to pay    what    time to enter into discuss
amounts to reverse reparations to a poten-  both of other occupying
tially prosperous Germany in order to keep  those newly constituted
the Germans under their rule from starving  their zones of occupation.'
to death . . . Anglo-American agreement is    The New York Sun:
the first constructive step taken to remedy  many ceases to be an ec
the situation now prevailing in Germany."   center of Europe, the be-
l. . . This start at economic coordination  only for that continent bu
comes late in postwar Europe's second       a whole."
winter. General William H. Draper, Chief
of Economics, US     Occupation  Forces,
says that physical deterioration from slow       Most Difficult
starvation has begun in Germany. All the      According to an editoria
damage cannot be repaired, but lots of lost  Times the most difficult pi
time can be made up."                       today is that of reeducati(
Radio commentator Joseph C. Harsch said:  Military Government offi
"Our Bipartisan foreign policy produced one  they can, the job (of redii
of its most constructive results in the firm  mind) can never be done
agreement between our government and the    Times point out. "It mu
British to merge our two zones of occupation  Germans themselves.
in Germany . . . If we and the British can    "There are, fortunately.
make our combined zones an international    do the work. A German o
asset instead of an international liability  Fritz Ernst of Heidelberg,
then perhaps the French and Russians will   tribution in this intellecti
see their way to joining . . . If all could  new  German magazine,
approach the task together and not in com-  meaning 'The Transforn
petition, Germany could be among us."       Ernst concludes that wh;
ng.  'e A    self-
nterest but in ours.
of humanity but to
.ng a national slum
nd frustration that
r to their neighbors
a good gamble. It
ial investment than
but it seems likely
nev and in trouble
avid Penn:  "Im-
eement is, (British
t only as the first
economic unity of
Ls envisioned and
am Protocol. Both
ad anxious at any
ions with either or
powers to extend
arrangements to
"The sooner Ger-
conomic vacuunl in
[ter it will be not
tt for the world as
Problem
1 in The New York
roblem in Germany
on. "Though Allied
cials do the best
-ecting the German
by outsiders," the
st be done by the
Germans who can
f this kind is Prof.
who makes a con-
aal grouping in a
'Die Wandlung,'
iation.' Professor
at Germany needs
23
III     1!
i
I
", r1r-V1 .1
Qt',
_ I_0.0
Bizonal Agreemenf Viewed as                    Eliner Daivs:
beginning toward
Firsf Sfep     fo  Economic      Unify       supporting. Not in i
The recent a-rceiiient between the United  Not merely for rea.,
States and Britain for economic unification   prevent them from I
of the British and American Occupation        of disease, nialnutrit
Zones in Germany was regarded by US press     would make them a i
and radio as a much needed first step toward  once again. It look,,;
relieving the victor nations of the cost of   will require a great(
indefinitely supporting the German economy.  the present arran-ei
Comment inade the point that the Britisii.-  to cost us less both
American move was in accord with the Pots-   in the lonm run."
dam Agreement calling for economic unifica-     Radio conimentat
tion of Germany and expressed the hope that   portant as this nev
economic unification can be extended to the   and Americans) reg
French and Russian Zones.                    step toward achievii
The New York Times regarded the agree-      Germany as a wl
ment as a move "to put an end to the          agreed upon in the
anomalous situation which compels the United  governments are re,
States and Great Britain to pay     what     time to enter into d
amounts to reverse reparations to a poten-   both of other occu]
tially prosperous Germany in order to keep   those newly   const
the Germans under their rule from starvin-  their zones of occup
to death . . . Anglo-American agreement is      The New York
the first constructive stop taken to remedy   many ceases to be
the situation now prevailing in Germany."     center of Europe, t
11. . . This start at econoutic coordination  only for that confin,
comes late in   postwar Europe's second       a whole."
winter. General William H. Draper, Chief
of  Economics, US     Occupation  Forces,          Mosf Diff i
says that physical deterioration from slow
starvation has begun in Germany. All the        According to an e('
damage cannot be repaired, but lots of lost  Times the most diffi4
time can be made tip."                       today is that of reec'
Radio commentator Joseph C. Harsch said:   Military Governmen
"Our Bipartisan foreign policy produced one   they can, the job (o.
of its most constructive results in the firin  mind) can never be
agreement between our government and the      Times point out. -
British to merge our two zones of occupation  Germans themselves
in Germany . . . If we and the British can      "There are, fortur
make our combined zones an international      do the work. A Ger:
,is et instead of an international liability  Fritz Ernst of Heid(
then perhaps the French and Russians will    tribution in this ini
see their way to joining . . . If all could  new   German mag,
approach the task together and not in com.-  meaning 'The Trai
petition, Germany could be among us."        Ernst concludes thn


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