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Miles, Nelson Appleton, 1839-1925 / Personal recollections and observations of General Nelson A. Miles embracing a brief view of the Civil War, or, From New England to the Golden Gate: and the story of his Indian campaigns, with comments on the exploration, development and progress of our great western empire
(1896)

Chapter XXXIX. Incidents of the Apache campaign,   pp. 506-518 PDF (4.7 MB)


Page 506


PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF
                           CHAPTER XXXIX.
                  INCIDENTS OF THE APACHE CAMPAIGN.
TITE STOlRY OF THE AVOUUNDEJ) APACHlE-CAPTAIN  OODI)'S STOR -CHARACTER or
APACHE RAIDS-
Tif]n CASE "F TIlE PECK FAMILY-INDIAN IDEAS ABOUT INSANE PERSONS-FIGIIT
BETWEEN
   APx(AlIES AND MAIEXICANS, AND SOMIE OF ITS RESULTS-MEETING TilE MEXICAN
TROOPS-
   F1IN)ING TIlE MURI)ERED MEXICANS-FINDING DEAD BODIES O(N TIlE MARCH-INDIAN
      MANNER OF RID1ING HORSES TO DEATIh-THE OLD MINES OF MExICO-HOW THE
      SOLI)IEIS MARCIIEI), ATE AND SLEPT-SURPRISING AN IND)IAN CAMIP-PRE-
         LIMINARIIES OF SURRENDER  AT FRONITERAS-GERONIM() COMES IN-
         AGREEMEINT TO SURRENDEnR-MAIEETING AVITT THE MEXICAN SOL-
            DIERS -GERONEIMIO'S FRIENDLY  OFFER  To ASSIST  MEXICAN
            NERVEOUSNESS-LOSING  A COlMlMANDI) -A NEW  RIFLE -A
               ST AMPPI'EI)E--M\ETXICN TOWNS -ENTREME HARDSHIP OF
               T IlI C, AMI P AIGNT -THE  PROPORTIO(NT OF S 7RVIVORS
                  -GERON IMO'S  PHIILOSOPIIY  OF  SURRENDERl
N July, while at Fort Apache, I had found the Indian be-
  fore referred to, who had been wounded in Hatfield's fight,
  and who had worked his way north to Camp Apache      He
  had avoided the troops by traveling along the crests of the
  mountains, and had contrived to subsist on field-inice, rab-
  bits, the juice of the giant cactus, and whatever he could
  find to sustain life. He reported that when he left the camp
  of the hostiles thev were much w orn down and disheartened,
         and that some of themi were disposed to surrender.  I was
satisfied fronm his story that this was the time to demand a surrender, and
that he could be made useful in opening comimunication with the hostiles.
I, therefore, decided to send him with one other Indian, under the charge
of
Lieutenant Gatewood, to seek out the hostile camp and demand a surrender.
   Captain Leonard Wood, the only officer who was with Captain Lawton
during the entire campaign, is at present stationed at Washington, D. C.,
and gives me the following interesting account of the Apache campaign
south of the border, front notes taken by him during the time.
                  CAPTAIN LEONARD WOOIYS STORY.
   As illustrating the character of the raiding done by these Apaches, I
may mention the case of the Peck family. Their ranch was surrounded
by Indians, the entire family was captured, and several of the farm-hands


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